Third Optimized Fleet Response Plan Carrier Strike Group Returns Home

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By Rear Adm. Bruce Lindsey
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

After completing a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations in support of maritime theater security operations and flying missions supporting Operation Inherent Resolve over the skies of Iraq and Syria, the ships and squadrons of the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group returned safely home.

Thousands of friends and family members lined the piers of Naval Station Norfolk to welcome home more than 6,000 strike group Sailors! More than 300 Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 aircrew flew home to cheering, flag-waving crowds in Norfolk, Oceana, Mayport and Whidbey Island.

While deployed, CVW-8 and USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) launched 11,437 sorties, completed 1,924 combat missions. With flawless execution the aviators successfully delivered 1,717 pieces of ordnance on target with devastating lethality. By the end of the deployment, our aviators logged an amazing 30,873 flight hours and 7,868 arrested landings. These impressive numbers set post-Desert Storm records for any CVN/CVW team.

This deployment is yet another example of the pivotal role naval aviation plays in our national defense. As the U.S. Navy’s ‘Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority’ states, we have the mission to “conduct PROMPT and SUSTAINED combat power from and at sea, necessary to fight and win decisively in contested and denied environments against our enemies.” That is exactly what the men and women of CVW-8 and the strike group accomplished on deployment. The team delivered a devastating blow to the capabilities of ISIS, allowing our partners on the battlefield to employ a strategic initiative to retake large swaths of land in Northern Iraq and Syria.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 8, 2017) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) operate in formation during exercise Saxon Warrior 2017. The United States and United Kingdom co-hosted carrier strike group exercise demonstrates interoperability and capability to respond to crises and deter potential threats. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

I have written several blog posts about how our carriers benefit from the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (OFRP). OFRP is designed to maximize our return on training and maintenance investments, to maintain Sailor quality of life and ensure units are fully employable and deployable. By the time the strike group deployed, it was at the peak of readiness and this was clearly demonstrated through their record-setting accomplishments.

With USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) now at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to begin her maintenance phase, the first phase of the four-part OFRP cycle, George H.W. Bush enters the post deployment portion of its sustainment phase to maintain her combat readiness in order to be prepared to deploy fully ready combat forces if required by our Nation.

While George H.W. Bush is in her sustainment phase, CVW-8 will also be in sustainment. For the air wing, this means several underway periods to maintain their carrier qualification requirements, maintain their aircraft at optimum performance levels and provide continuous training in combat flight operations and maintenance.

Meeting these standards will allow CVW-8 to effectively remain combat ready around the clock in the event the president of the United States decides they need to surge an additional carrier strike group.

This will be a challenge, but I have every confidence that the George H. W. Bush Carrier Strike Group team will not only meet but also exceed our leadership’s standards and expectations.

Finally, I send my strongest congratulations to entire carrier strike group for your tireless efforts and commitment to the Navy’s standard of excellence. Bravo Zulu, well done and welcome home!

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 18, 2017) Sailors assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 celebrate as the squadron flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The ship and its carrier strike group were transiting home from a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)


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Third Optimized Fleet Response Plan Carrier Strike Group Returns Home

Your Navy Operating Forward – Norwegian Sea, Mutsu Bay, Indian Ocean

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Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


CORAL SEA: Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Sirus Woodard directs a Humvee onto Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1651 from the amphibious transport dock ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) as part of an amphibious assault during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors perform post-flight checks on an F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

INDIAN OCEAN: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) receives supplies during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob M. Milham/Released)

TOWNSHEND ISLAND: A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) from Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, pulls into the beach to drop off equipment as part of a large-scale amphibious assault exercise during Talisman Saber 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Alexandra Seeley/Released)

CORAL SEA: Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Christian Hall, from Charleston, S.C., fires an air slug aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) during Talisman Saber 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: Sailors remove sonobouys from a MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Wolf Pack” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during Exercise Malabar. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Colby S. Comery/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the “Golden Warriors” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87 launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

CORAL SEA: An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Saberhawks” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77 lands on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cameron McCulloch/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) transits the Norwegian Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

MUTSU BAY, Japan: Explosive ordnance disposal technicians assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 prepare for a diving exercise with members of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and members of the Republic of Korea navy Underwater Demolition Team in Japan’s Mutsu Bay during the 2JA Mine Countermeasure Exercise. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alfred A. Coffield/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) leads a formation of ships from the Indian navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and the U.S. Navy in the Bay of Bengal as part of Exercise Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole Schroeder/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


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Your Navy Operating Forward – Norwegian Sea, Mutsu Bay, Indian Ocean

Joint Strike Fighter F-35C CF-6 Ferry & Arrival

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The first U.S. Navy-owned Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) arrived at its new home with the Navy’s Strike Fighter Squadron 101 (VFA) in Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

The arrival of this first jet fighter is just one of many to come. Strike Fighter Squadron 101 is set to be the replacement squadron with the F-35C Lightning II CV, whom will train both pilots and maintainers.

But, what’s so special about this aircraft? You can find out here!

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Joint Strike Fighter F-35C CF-6 Ferry & Arrival