Your Navy Operating Forward – Norwegian Sea, Mutsu Bay, Indian Ocean

Image 170719-N-UX013-340-1024x683.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


CORAL SEA: Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Sirus Woodard directs a Humvee onto Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1651 from the amphibious transport dock ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) as part of an amphibious assault during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors perform post-flight checks on an F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael B. Zingaro/Released)

INDIAN OCEAN: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) receives supplies during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob M. Milham/Released)

TOWNSHEND ISLAND: A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) from Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, pulls into the beach to drop off equipment as part of a large-scale amphibious assault exercise during Talisman Saber 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Alexandra Seeley/Released)

CORAL SEA: Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Christian Hall, from Charleston, S.C., fires an air slug aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) during Talisman Saber 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: Sailors remove sonobouys from a MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Wolf Pack” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during Exercise Malabar. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Colby S. Comery/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the “Golden Warriors” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87 launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

CORAL SEA: An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Saberhawks” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77 lands on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cameron McCulloch/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) transits the Norwegian Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

MUTSU BAY, Japan: Explosive ordnance disposal technicians assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 prepare for a diving exercise with members of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and members of the Republic of Korea navy Underwater Demolition Team in Japan’s Mutsu Bay during the 2JA Mine Countermeasure Exercise. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alfred A. Coffield/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) leads a formation of ships from the Indian navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and the U.S. Navy in the Bay of Bengal as part of Exercise Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole Schroeder/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments

View original article:  

Your Navy Operating Forward – Norwegian Sea, Mutsu Bay, Indian Ocean

Your Navy Operating Forward -Black Sea, Coral Sea, Bay of Bangal

Image 170710-N-ZW825-156-1024x683.jpg


MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors prepare to launch an F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)



Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


CORAL SEA: The amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) transits the Coral Sea during a replenishment-at-sea as part of Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

DJIBOUTI CITY, Djibouti: Members of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 1 maneuver into position for a harbor security mission in Djibouti City, Djibouti. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Natalia Murillo/Released)

BLACK SEA: The Tioconderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) fires its Mark 86 5-inch gun during a live-fire gunnery exercise in conjunction with exercise Sea Breeze 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua M. Tolbert/Released)

CORAL SEA: The amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), right, transits alongside the Henry J. Kaiser-class fleet replenishment oiler USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) during a replenishment-at-sea during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Gavin Shields/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors prepare to launch an F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) transits the Bay of Bengal during Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Craig Z. Rodarte/Released)

ARTA BEACH, Djibouti: Sailors attached to Beach Master Unit 2 aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) prepare to enter the well deck while embarked on a landing craft unit attached to Assault Craft Unit 4. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raymond Minami/Released)

SHOALWATER BAY, Australia: Sailors launch Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1651, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, from the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) to deliver supplies to Marines attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) on shore as part of a large-scale amphibious assault during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

BLACK SEA: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) fires its Mark 45 5-inch lightweight gun while operating with the Ukrainian Border Guard anti-submarine corvette Hryhoriy Kuropyatnykov (BG 50) during exercise Sea Breeze 2017 in the Black Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Andre Pangkerego guides an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Ray Nunez Jr./Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: Sailors aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59) conduct a replenishment-at-sea during Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger/Released)

ODESSA, Ukraine: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) and the Turkish navy frigate TCG Turgutreis (F 241) depart Odessa, Ukraine, for the at-sea phase of exercise Sea Breeze 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments

Edit


Check Also


“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

Continue reading here – 

Your Navy Operating Forward -Black Sea, Coral Sea, Bay of Bangal

Your Navy Operating Forward – Poland, Spain, China

Image 170618-N-LK571-316-1024x732.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


PACIFIC OCEAN: An EA-18G Growler assigned to the “Gauntlets” of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 136 receives fuel from an F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Kestrels” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 as part of an air power demonstration above the aircreaft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a tiger cruise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Granito/Released)

ROTA, Spain: Equipment Operator Constructionman Calan DeRue, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 1, drives a backhoe onto a C-130 Hercules aircraft at Naval Station Rota, Spain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brannon Deugan/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the “Black Lions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, fully loaded with 10 GBU-32 1,000 pound bombs, prepares to launch from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

CORAL SEA: Sailors aboard the Henry J. Kaiser-class replenishment oiler USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204) receive cargo from the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Gavin Shields/Released)

SOUTH CHINA SEA: Members of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 perform a fast-rope exercise from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Golden Falcons” of Helicopter Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 onto the flight deck of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Izumo-class helicopter destroyer JS Izumo (DDH 183). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nathan Burke/Released)

USTKA, Poland: A landing craft, air cushion lands on the beach in Ustka, Poland, during an amphibious assault landing demonstration as part of exercise BALTOPS 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist America A. Henry/Released)

ZHANJIANG, China: Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) man the rails as the ship prepares to depart Zhanjiang, China. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

SUBIC BAY, Philippines: The Spearhead-class joint high speed vessel USNS Millinocket (JHSV 3) transits Subic Bay behind the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Tridents” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 carries supplies to the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mario Coto/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments


Check Also


USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was involved in a collision with a merchant vessel at approximately …

Link:  

Your Navy Operating Forward – Poland, Spain, China

Naval Audit Readiness and You

Image 19383643089_7521f3ac58_o-e1437123535921.jpg

By Karen Fenstermacher
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Operations)

Every day, hundreds of thousands of dedicated Navy personnel work together to achieve critical goals on shore and at sea. We deploy to conflict zones. We engage in humanitarian operations. We push our limits. And behind these efforts are the ships, submarines, aircraft, facilities and infrastructure, technology, and other resources that allow us, the people of the U.S. Navy, to do what we do.

But behind those resources, there’s something even more fundamental. So fundamental, you probably don’t think about it on a day-to-day basis. It’s our finances.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (July 9, 2015) USS Ross (DDG 71) receives supplies from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Bighorn (T-AO 198) during an underway replenishment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA (July 9, 2015) USS Ross (DDG 71) receives supplies from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Bighorn (T-AO 198) during an underway replenishment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

Every year, Congress appropriates taxpayer money to support Navy operations, and we use that money to buy supplies, outfit our ships, procure new equipment and pay our people. It’s that money that sustains our readiness to meet any mission. And it’s more important than ever that we demonstrate to Congress and the American people that we’re holding ourselves accountable and managing that money wisely.

Ensign Jarrett Seibel, disbursing officer aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) credits money to Yeoman 2nd Class Jorge Esparza's Navy Cash Card. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darien G. Kenney/Released)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (Sept. 13, 2012) Ensign Jarrett Seibel, disbursing officer aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) credits money to Yeoman 2nd Class Jorge Esparza’s Navy Cash Card. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darien G. Kenney/Released)

As a part of that effort, we are about to undergo our first full financial statement audit. In September, a public accounting firm will assess the Navy’s financial statements, transactions, internal controls and IT systems to determine whether we have accurately accounted for the funding we receive and spend.

Sailor or civilian, admiral or ensign, seaman or chief petty officer, the audit affects every one of us. Our money drives our resources, our resources drive our people, and our people drive our mission. Further, reliable financial information can serve as a valuable tool to help commands, program managers and senior executives make informed decisions and strengthen mission readiness. And just as we work together to support each other, it’s important that we work together to support the audit!

Office of Financial Operations is launching a new series of audit readiness training videos that will outline your role in the audit across nine key business areas. They’ll explain the audit concepts you need to know, show you how to prepare and tell you what to expect when the audit begins.

Visit the the audit readiness website to watch the videos that apply to you, find reference materials for further review, and earn up to two CET credits. And don’t forget to play the immersive knowledge check – I challenge you to beat my high score as we all prepare for the audit that will help sustain our readiness in the fleet and beyond.

Sailors move stores during a working party in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The ship is pierside following a deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)
NORFOLK (Feb. 2, 2017) Sailors move stores during a working party in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)

We’re all accountable for the Navy’s resources. When we work together toward sound financial stewardship, audit preparation becomes a part of the way we do business every day. And that makes us a stronger team, a stronger Navy and a more powerful force around the globe.


Comments

comments

Credit: 

Naval Audit Readiness and You

Your Navy Operating Forward – Japan, Philippines, Bahrain

Image 170516-N-XN177-351-683x1024.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


YOKOSUKA, Japan: The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) departs Fleet Activities Yokosuka for its 2017 patrol. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Burghart/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk attached to the “Tridents” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 prepares to carry supplies during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mario Coto/Released)

KADENA, Japan: Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Alfonzo Bridgett, assigned to the “Tridents” of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26, places a torpedo under a P-8A Poseidon aircraft at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean R. Morton/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk attached to the “Tridents” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 carries supplies to the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) (GHWB). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mario Coto/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Fire Controlman 2nd Class Brandon Godina, from San Antonio, Texas, returns to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) from the French Navy Cassard-class anti-air frigate FS Jean Bart (D615). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mario Coto/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors chock and chain an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 46 during flight quarters aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

KADENA, Japan: Aviation Ordnanceman Christian Harman, assigned to the “Tridents” of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26, drives a MHU 38 loader at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean R. Morton/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments


Check Also


“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

See the original post: 

Your Navy Operating Forward – Japan, Philippines, Bahrain

Your Navy Operating Forward – Croatia, Iceland, Vietnam

Image 170426-N-N0901-004-1024x683.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

SPLIT, Croatia: A Sailor assigned to the “Ghostriders” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 conducts a search and rescue, survivor recovery demonstration in Split, Croatia. (U.S. Navy photo)
SPLIT, Croatia: A Sailor assigned to the “Ghostriders” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 conducts a search and rescue, survivor recovery demonstration in Split, Croatia. (U.S. Navy photo)
ARABIAN GULF: Sailors assigned to the "Blackhawks" of Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 15, search for a target while manning a GUA-21 .50 caliber machine gun on the back of an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter off the coast of Bahrain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joshua Bryce Bruns/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: Sailors assigned to the “Blackhawks” of Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 15, search for a target while manning a GUA-21 .50 caliber machine gun on the back of an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter off the coast of Bahrain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joshua Bryce Bruns/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the "Tomcatters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 lands aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet attached to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 lands aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
KEFLAVIK, Iceland: A P-8A Poseidon aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, arrives in Keflavik, Iceland, for anti-submarine warfare training. U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, joint, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Grade Matthew Skoglund/Released)
KEFLAVIK, Iceland: A P-8A Poseidon aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, arrives in Keflavik, Iceland, for anti-submarine warfare training. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Grade Matthew Skoglund/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 conduct a foreign object debris walkdown during flight quarters aboard littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 conduct a foreign object debris walkdown during flight quarters aboard littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 move the MQ-8B Firescout unmanned aerial vehicle onto the flight deck in preparation for ground turns aboard the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: Sailors assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 move the MQ-8B Firescout unmanned aerial vehicle onto the flight deck in preparation for ground turns aboard the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis/Released)
DA NANG, Vietnam: The expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Fall River (T-EPF-4) arrives in Da Nang Tien Sa Port to participate in Pacific Partnership 2017 Da Nang. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released)
DA NANG, Vietnam: The expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Fall River (T-EPF-4) arrives in Da Nang Tien Sa Port to participate in Pacific Partnership 2017 Da Nang. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments


Check Also


“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

See more here:  

Your Navy Operating Forward – Croatia, Iceland, Vietnam

Your Navy Operating Forward – Red Sea, Korea, Guam

Image 170426-N-BL637-175-1024x731.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

PHILIPPINE SEA: The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), foreground, and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Atago-class guided-missile destroyer JS Ashigara (DDG 178), left, and the JMSDF Murasame-class destroyer JS Samidare (DD 106) transit the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA: The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), foreground, and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Atago-class guided-missile destroyer JS Ashigara (DDG 178), left, and the JMSDF Murasame-class destroyer JS Samidare (DD 106) transit the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA: An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter from the "Blue Hawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 78 fires chaff flares during a training exercise near the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA: An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter from the “Blue Hawks” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 78 fires chaff flares during a training exercise near the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the "Tomcatters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 prepares to land aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 prepares to land aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)
BUSAN, Republic of Korea: The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN 727) arrives in Busan for a scheduled port visit while conducting routine patrols throughout the western Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jermaine Ralliford/Released)
BUSAN, Republic of Korea: The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN 727) arrives in Busan for a scheduled port visit while conducting routine patrols throughout the western Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jermaine Ralliford/Released)
CARIBBEAN SEA: The Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Zephyr (PC 8) transits the Caribbean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins/Released)
CARIBBEAN SEA: The Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Zephyr (PC 8) transits the Caribbean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey J. Hopkins/Released)
GUAM: A MK VI patrol boat assigned to Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 1, Det. Guam, maneuvers off the coast of Guam. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alfred A. Coffield/Released)
GUAM: A MK VI patrol boat assigned to Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 1, Det. Guam, maneuvers off the coast of Guam. (U.S. Navy Combat Camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alfred A. Coffield/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the "Tridents" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 carries cargo during a vertical replenishment aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jennifer M. Kirkman/Released)
ARABIAN GULF: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the “Tridents” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 carries cargo during a vertical replenishment aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jennifer M. Kirkman/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) receives a refueling probe during a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ross (DDG 71) receives a refueling probe during a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)
RED SEA: The guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) transits the Red Sea during a photo exercise to conclude Exercise Eagle Salute 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyrell K. Morris/Released)
RED SEA: The guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) transits the Red Sea during a photo exercise to conclude Exercise Eagle Salute 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tyrell K. Morris/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments

View original:  

Your Navy Operating Forward – Red Sea, Korea, Guam

Your Navy Operating Forward – Souda Bay, Gulf of Oman, Mediterranean Sea

Image 170125-N-GR361-056-1024x683.jpg

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

SASEBO, Japan: Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1666, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, approaches the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) during an ammunition onload. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kaleb R. Staples/Released)
SASEBO, Japan: Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1666, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, approaches the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) during an ammunition onload. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kaleb R. Staples/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors stand watch on the forecastle of the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) as it pulls into Souda Bay, Greece. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors stand watch on the forecastle of the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) as it pulls into Souda Bay, Greece. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Port Royal (CG 73) transits the South China Sea. (U.S. Navy photo Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sara B. Sexton/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Port Royal (CG 73) transits the South China Sea. (U.S. Navy photo Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sara B. Sexton/Released)
SOUDA BAY, Greece: The guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) arrives in Souda Bay, Greece. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
SOUDA BAY, Greece: The guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) arrives in Souda Bay, Greece. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) breaks away after a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) breaks away after a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
GULF OF OMAN: Two rigid-hull inflatable boats assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) approach an Iranian-flagged dhow during an approach and assist visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna K. Green/Released)
GULF OF OMAN: Two rigid-hull inflatable boats assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) approach an Iranian-flagged dhow during an approach and assist visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brianna K. Green/Released)
SASEBO, Japan: Landing craft utility (LCU) 1666, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, approaches the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) during an ammunition onload. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chris Williamson/Released)
SASEBO, Japan: Landing craft utility (LCU) 1666, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, approaches the amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) during an ammunition onload. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chris Williamson/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) fires a Mark 45 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) fires a Mark 45 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


Comments

comments


Check Also


“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

Source:

Your Navy Operating Forward – Souda Bay, Gulf of Oman, Mediterranean Sea

U.S. Navy Ocean Gliders: Unmanned Underwater Vehicles That Are Improving Our Understanding of the World’s Oceans

Image 160731-N-LS434-032.jpg

By Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet
Oceanographer of the Navy
Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command

In the wake of multiple news reports about U.S. Navy ocean gliders, there have been numerous questions about these instruments and what they do for the U.S. Navy.

AT SEA (July 31, 2016) A littoral battlespace sensing-glider (LBS-G) is deployed from a Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) T-AGS 60-class vessel. After deployment, civilian pilots command and control Naval Oceanographic Office gliders 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the Glider Operations Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
AT SEA (July 31, 2016) A littoral battlespace sensing-glider (LBS-G) is deployed from a Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) T-AGS 60-class vessel. After deployment, civilian pilots command and control Naval Oceanographic Office gliders 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the Glider Operations Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

Ocean gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles used to collect oceanographic data in an effort to better understand the ocean. The gliders are made by Teledyne Webb and are sold commercially. The Navy uses the gliders to collect ocean temperature, salinity and depth information, and transmit the unclassified data to Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) for assimilation into NAVOCEANO’s operational ocean models. They are used by scientists and professionals around the world working in academia, the oil and gas industry as well as the military. Gliders have been the workhorses of the operational Naval Oceanography program for nearly two decades.

In 2004, I was on one of the Navy’s survey vessels for the first deployment of a glider from a Navy ship. Afterwards, the U.S. Navy established the Littoral Battlespace Sensing-Gliders (LBS-G) as a program of record in 2010 and has been using these gliders operationally since 2012. Each glider is modular in design and buoyancy-driven, allowing it to collect oceanographic data on water pressure, temperature, salinity in the water column for up to four months without the need for active propulsion.

I fund and direct the operations of this glider fleet from NAVOCEANO at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. This fleet is the largest in the world, launched and recovered from six forward deployed military oceanographic survey vessels. NAVOCEANO’s scientists and Sailors conduct sea floor mapping from these ships to understand the undersea environment for military applications. Operations of the survey fleet is provided by the Military Sealift Command who own and operate the ships.

The gliders are piloted by personnel within NAVOCEANO’s Glider Operation Center (GOC) 24 hours a day, seven days a week at Stennis Space Center. In the event that the GOC loses contact with the instruments, they remain afloat in the ocean until located and recovered.

How do we use the data? NAVOCEANO uses the data collected for numerical modeling of ocean conditions. These models improve with glider data, which we share with regional partners to help their understanding of the environment.

Only 5 percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. These underwater robots allow us to explore more of the ocean, and faster, at a fraction of the cost of a manned submersible or a ship.  

Why does the Navy use gliders? Only 5 percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. These underwater robots allow us to explore more of the ocean, and faster, at a fraction of the cost of a manned submersible or a ship. The information gathered allows us to better predict ocean currents, density, sea states and tides which the U.S. Navy needs to safely and effectively operate all around the world. Once deployed, a glider can persistently sample the ocean for months freeing the ship to perform other functions.

I am extremely proud of our robust glider program. My goals for this program include expanding the current use of gliders, enabling the Fleet through the use of gliders and ocean models, and accelerating development and deployment of newer systems.

We have approximately 130 of these gliders and they are relatively inexpensive. The U.S. Navy will not only continue to use these technologies to improve our knowledge of the oceans, but we will be significantly increasing our use of gliders over the coming years so that our understanding of the ocean is the best in the world.


Comments

comments

See original – 

U.S. Navy Ocean Gliders: Unmanned Underwater Vehicles That Are Improving Our Understanding of the World’s Oceans