Teaching Today’s and Tomorrow’s Surface Navy to Fight and Win

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Kimberly M. Lansdale Center for Surface Combat Systems Public Affairs The Center for Surface Combat Systems (CSCS) headquarters’ staff oversees 14 learning sites and detachments located throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, Spain, and Japan. CSCS trains over 38,000 U.S. Navy and international Sailors each year. As a global organization, technology plays a key role in how we train surface warriors to fight and to win. In an ever-advancing technological society, CSCS implements a variety of training enablers to achieve the ultimate goal of Sailor 2025’s Ready, Relevant Learning (RRL) pillar — provide Sailors the right training at the right time in the most effective manner throughout their careers. The Navy introduced Surface Training Advanced Virtual Environment (STAVE) in 2013 to provide better quality training resulting in more rapid qualifications of Navy officers and Sailors. Instructional systems and simulated physical environments provide watchstanders and maintainers the ability to gain proficiency through repeatable exercises, drills, and evolutions ashore. STAVE-CS (Combat Systems) Solutions  Combined Integrated Air & Missile Defense (IAMD) and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Trainer (CIAT) The purpose of CIAT is to provide a warfighting training laboratory that is realistic and relevant in training our Sailors and officers to employ the full range of the combat system capability against advanced threats in complex operating environments. CSCS has two CIATs, one in San Diego, which opened in December 2018, and one in Norfolk, which opened in July 2019.  In addition, there are two Reconfigurable Combat Information Center Trainers, a CIAT minus the ASW capability, at the AEGIS Training and Readiness Center. CIAT provides our watchstanders a state-of-the-art training lab to detect, control and engage simulated modern threats in challenging environments. With an emphasis on realism, it replicates a warship’s actual combat suite. We can reduce visibility, increase wave heights, degrade weapons systems, overwhelm the radars with clutter returns, and in the end, force every single watchstander in combat to adapt to challenging threats. We have to ensure our Sailors have trained and succeeded in a “worst case” scenario. What makes CIAT unique is its ability to replay all decisions from a scenario in a full debrief. We synchronize all console and headset communications against the scenario ground truth to show each team the cause and effect of every decision. CIAT’s approach to immersive training has had an immediate impact on watch team cohesion and effectiveness and is unlike anything we have seen before.


Chief Operations Specialist Anna Penrod, left, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115), and Lt. Aaron Van Driessche, CSCS Det San Diego’s course supervisor for AWT, participate in an air defense scenario at the Combined Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Trainer (CIAT). CIAT is the Navy’s newest combat systems trainer. Rafael Peralta became the first warship to pilot the advance warfare-training curriculum at CIAT. 

  Aegis Ashore Team Trainer (AATT) Managed by CSCS Unit Dam Neck, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, AATT serves as the single site for training and certifying rotational Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) crews to serve at the Aegis Ashore site in Romania and a future site in Poland. It houses a mock-up of the shore-based Aegis Combat Information Center and Communication Center and hosts a complete replica of the tactical warfighting, communication and information technology systems resident at Romania. The AATT course includes an eight-week training and certification pipeline, a five-week basic phase conducted by CSCSU Dam Neck, a one-week qualification phase conducted by Afloat Training Group (ATG) Norfolk, and a two-week certification phase conducted by Tactical Training Group Atlantic (TACTRAGRULANT). During weeks one and two, CSCS instructs students on basic system capabilities and limitations, theater operational procedures, console operator familiarization, and BMD mission planning. During weeks three through five, the watch team executes a series of increasingly complex tactical team scenarios, flexing the extensive capabilities of the high fidelity trainer while turning the students into a cohesive tactical team. After the five-week basic phase, the crew completes their BMD Qualification (BMDQ) administered by ATG Norfolk. Following a successful BMDQ, TACTRAGRULANT supervises the execution of a BMD Exercise (BMDEX), in coordination with theater ballistic missile defense assets, as a capstone to the AATT course of instruction. AATT allows us to train, qualify, and certify our Sailors so when they arrive in Romania they are immediately prepared to contribute. This represents the next evolution in combat systems training and sets a clear standard for what we will strive to achieve in future training endeavors.


During a team training exercise at the Aegis Ashore Team Trainer (AATT), AATT students work at the consoles to gain experience working with the system and to certify for operations prior to deployment.

  High Fidelity Shore-Based Trainers The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Training Facility (LTF) is the first surface warfare training facility to provide integrated bridge and combat systems tactical scenario training for Sailors serving with an LCS. The LCS drives a new approach to individual, team, and unit-level training to accommodate the minimum manning and rotational crewing concepts. Operational demands do not allow sufficient time for under instruction watchstanding or proficiency training during operational periods, and crews do not have organic training teams or embedded training systems. This new approach drives the need for the shore-centric Train-to-Qualify and Train-to-Certify concepts, which rely heavily on high-fidelity shore-based trainers. Currently, an LTF in San Diego provides training for both LCS variants. Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center (FLEASWTRACEN) operates it. CSCS has a second LTF, located at Naval Station Mayport, which CSCS Detachment Mayport operates. It provides training for the LCS 1 variant. LCS’s small crew size and lack of embedded systems mandate the use of high-fidelity training systems ashore to achieve crew training and readiness objectives.


Lt. j.g. Journae Webb, assigned to the Freedom-class littoral combat ship USS Little Rock (LCS 9), serves as Officer of the Deck during live-action, interactive virtual-reality training at the Littoral Training Facility, Naval Station Mayport, June 26, 2019. All Sailors and officers assigned to an LCS train in watch stations using virtual-reality technology, and are required to demonstrate proficiency in their respective watch stations, before manning live, shipboard watches. 

  Looking Ahead These are just a few of our STAVE-CS initiatives. STAVE-CS is already improving combat readiness by providing better-trained, better-qualified Sailors to the fight. CSCS will continue to implement new technologies that shape the Sailor of today and tomorrow. An example of this is Distributed STAVE-CS, which encompasses instructional systems and simulated physical environments that can be taught from one location and delivered simultaneously through high-bandwidth communications flow to multiple other sites. It will provide tactical watchstanders and maintainers the ability to gain proficiency through repeatable exercises, drills and evolutions ashore. Surface Training Advanced Virtual Environment – Combat Systems (STAVE-CS)  The video below highlights how STAVE-CS provides significant advantages by training in a virtual environment using courseware and simulators owned and implemented by the Navy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Uf3WtQ-phY&feature=youtu.be Combined Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Trainer (CIAT) CIAT was delivered in 2018 as the most capable combat systems trainer developed for the Navy surface force. This video highlights how CIAT trains operators of current AEGIS Baselines in IAMD and the latest AN/SQQ-89A(V)15 ASW deliveries using virtualized tactical code in San Diego and Norfolk. CIAT includes an in-depth, integrated debrief capability for individual and team analysis by recording simulation of scenario ground truth, instructor and watchstander console displays and audio for after-action reporting in support of student and instructor analysis. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPJKsFhBp30&feature=youtu.be For the latest CSCS news, make sure to visit our Facebook page.  


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Teaching Today’s and Tomorrow’s Surface Navy to Fight and Win

Grand Junction Celebrates Its First Navy Week

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Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class Charles Hardmon, from Egg Harbor Township, N.J., assigned to USS Constitution, gives a presentation to campers of East Camp at the Lincoln Park Recreation Center as part of Grand Junction Navy Week. T(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)



Grand Junction, Colorado might be a land-locked state and hundreds of miles from the nearest ocean, but that didn’t stop the Navy from sailing into town July 22 – 28 to celebrate the town’s first ever Navy Week. Navy Week is an outreach program that travels to cities without a significant Navy presence, giving people who might never otherwise interact with the Navy, an opportunity to learn what the U.S. Navy does.  The weeklong engagement also plays a vital role in connecting the American public with Sailors, assets and Navy equipment introducing local communities with an understanding of why having a strong Navy is so invaluable to our country. Both residents and Sailors interacted in outreach events providing the opportunity for visible awareness of the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.


Future Sailors from Navy Recruiting Division (NRD) Metropolitan took the oath of enlistment from Rear Adm. Bret Batchelder, senior executive host of Western Slope Navy Week, at the Colorado National Monument, July 24. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Holly L. Herline)

Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class Charles Hardmon, from Egg Harbor Township, N.J., assigned to USS Constitution, gives a presentation to campers of East Camp at the Lincoln Park Recreation Center as part of Grand Junction Navy Week. T(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

The U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, diamond pilots perform the “Diamond 360” maneuver in a demonstration at the Grand Junction Air Show in Grand Junction, Colo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Gordon/Released)

Capt. Fred Goldhammer, commanding officer of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19), gives a flag flown aboard Mesa Verde to the family of Mesa County Sherriff’s Deputy Derek Greer at a memorial service for Greer during Navy Week Grand Junction. Greer, a Navy veteran, was killed after responding to 911 reports of a masked man with a gun. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Lt. j.g. Antonio Alamazan, assigned to the amphibious transport dock ship USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19), speaks with local radio station about the Navy and ship during the Western Slope Navy Week and Mesa Verde Namesake visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brent Pyfrom/Released)

Lt. Cmdr. David Gardner, the public affairs officer assigned to the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, interacts with fans at America’s Navy’s Virtual Reality Experience during the Grand Junction Air Show at Grand Junction, Colo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Gordon/Released)

Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class Charles Hardmon, from Egg Harbor Township, N.J., assigned to USS Constitution, takes a selfie with West Camp summer campers at West Middle School during Grand Junction Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Sailors from Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 meet with Army veteran Ann Reynolds, who recently turned 100 years old, during a Meals on Wheels Mesa County meal delivery, July 23, 2019. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Holly L. Herline/Released)

Rear Adm. Brett C. Batchelder, director of Maritime Operations (N04), U.S. Fleet Forces Command, speaks at a memorial service for Mesa County Sherriff’s Deputy Derek Greer during Navy Week Grand Junction. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class Charles Hardmon, from Egg Harbor Township, N.J., assigned to USS Constitution, gives a presentation to West Camp summer campers at West Middle School during Grand Junction Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities remaining in 2019 are:

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20


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“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

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Grand Junction Celebrates Its First Navy Week

Quad Cities Celebrate Navy Week

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The eighth Navy Week of 2019 took America’s Navy to Quad Cities, Iowa, June 24-30.  Navy Weeks play a vital role in connecting the American public with Sailors, assets and Navy equipment. The weeklong engagement introduced the local communities, who do not have frequent visibility of the Navy, with an understanding of why having a strong Navy is so invaluable to our country. Both residents and Sailors interacted in outreach events providing the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand with a visible awareness of the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.


Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) pose for a picture with Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the ship’s sponsor and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, in front of the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Taylor Ruggles, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses life aboard the ship with a member of Lindsay Park Yacht Club during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One suit up a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team in a bomb suit at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)

Kelly Sullivan Loughren, the sponsor of guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) and granddaughter of Albert Sullivan, one of five brothers who are the namesake for the ship, explains the story behind artifacts in the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum to Sailors assigned to USS The Sullivans during a visit to Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

The U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, diamond pilots perform the Low Break Cross maneuver during a demonstration at the Quad City Air Show at the Davenport Municipal Airport in Davenport, Iowa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Schumaker/Released)

Members of Navy Band Great Lakes play a concert at the Family Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

Sailors assigned to USS Constitution parade the colors before the start of a River Bandits Minor League baseball game during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

Sailors assigned to guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) visit the Sullivan family memorial in Calvary Cemetery in Waterloo, Iowa as part of Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

After being suited up by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technicians assigned to EOD Group One, a member of the Quad Cities Elite FIRST Robotics Competition Team greets his peers at the Arconic Learning Center during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Helen Brown/Released)

Hull Technician 3rd Class Pamela Hensley, assigned to USS Constitution, discusses the ship’s hull construction with visitors at Putnam Museum during Quad Cities Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nathan Roth/Released)

Check to see if a Navy Week is coming to your community.  Scheduled cities in 2019 are:

– Duluth, Minn., July 15-21

– Grand Junction, Colo., July 22-28

– Boise, Idaho, Aug. 19-25

– St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2-8

– Wichita, Kan., Sept. 9-15

– Charleston, W.V., Oct. 14-20


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Quad Cities Celebrate Navy Week

Maintaining Trust of Our Sailors and Families Residing in Public Private Venture and Government Housing

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From Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith

Trust and confidence are the foundational bedrock upon which effective command rests. These principles are directly tied to our mission; if we lose the trust of our Sailors, Marines and their families, if they are disconnected or distracted, the entire team suffers. The Sailors and Marines in our care must be confident that when they bring a problem to their chain of command – preferably to their division officer and their division chief – their command leadership will advocate tirelessly on their behalf.

We are facing an urgent issue affecting not only the trust and confidence of our Sailors and their families, but also their health, safety and well-being. As we have discovered, in some cases the condition of our government and public private venture family housing aboard our installations is not where it should be. Our Sailors and their families deserve safe, quality living quarters and commands must advocate for our Sailors and their families. To that end, we are prioritizing efforts to better understand our Sailors’ living conditions in on-base government family and PPV housing, to ensure that as residents, they are provided with the quality of life they have earned and deserve.Our Sailors and their families deserve safe, quality living quarters and commands must advocate for our Sailors and their families.

What went wrong? The government role in the privatized partnership arrangement has become too passive, leaving the day-to-day operation of the housing program to the residents and the private partners. We need to re-engage, especially at the command level, to advocate for our Sailors. CNIC, with support from OPNAV and NAVFAC, is on the job, already engaged in actions that will increase oversight of the partners, introduce improved quality assurance of the housing operations, follow-up on issues, add feedback mechanisms after trouble calls are closed out, focus on improved customer service, and begin a robust series of resident engagements ranging from email and social media outreach, town halls, and home visits by invitation. These efforts will be supplemented by command action on behalf of our Sailors and their families: 100 percent contact with all of your Sailors to invite them to specifically share their housing situation, experiences and unresolved issues. They may choose to decline these conversations, and they must not be pushed or pressured. During these conversations, for those in PPV or government housing, commands will offer to visit their residence if they desire. But visit or not, 100 percent of PPV residents will be engaged by their chain of command to ensure we understand their situation.

No later than April 15, 2019, every Sailor residing in PPV or government housing will be afforded an opportunity for a visit from their command at their residence. The purpose of these visits is threefold:

  • to raise our Navy awareness of family living conditions
  • to personally observe any issues affecting the home and to understand any actions being taken to address them
  • if a problem is found, to help your Sailor and their family get the problem resolved. In short, the purpose of the visit is to be their advocate.

This is not an inspection program; visits are to be strictly voluntary, by invitation only, and executed in accordance with the process set forth below.

Every Sailor with a PPV or government residence will be personally asked by their division officer if they would like to schedule a time for a visit from leaders in their command, ideally their division chief and division officer, to put eyes on any problems that the Sailor and their family are experiencing. It will be made clear to the Sailor that allowing the visit is purely voluntary and there will be no negative ramifications should either the Sailor or the Sailor’s family member decline a visit. Sailors and families will have an opportunity to ask any questions about the visit. If Sailors and families agree to a visit, a two-person team, ideally the Sailor’s division officer and division chief, will conduct the home visit. During the visit, command leadership will discuss how any problems are being resolved. The discussion should include the Sailor and all other adult family members living in the residence, provided the family member desires to participate.

For officers in PPV or government housing desiring a visit, use a similar approach, with at least one of the visiting team being senior to that of the officer whose residence will be visited (e.g., the respective department head for a division officer).

Finally, the command will vigorously assist families to get problems fixed, using existing procedures. If the Sailor declines a visit, the division officer will offer to discuss any housing issues with the Sailor or their family members by phone. In taking these steps, we will enhance understanding between the command and each Sailor and their family.

... the command will vigorously assist families to get problems fixed ...

Each team will consist of officers and/or chief petty officers only. In general, the most appropriate approach will be visits conducted by division officers and divisional leading chief petty officers. The uniform for the visit will be determined by the unit commanding officer. A minimum of one day prior to the scheduled visit, the senior member of the visit team will call or meet with the Sailor (or adult family member, if deployed) to be visited in order to confirm the time and date of the home visit.

At the beginning of the visit, the purpose of the visit will be explained to both Sailor and family and any datasheet used to record the information gathered during the visit will be shown to both. It is important to note that these visits are not inspections; they are by invitation of the residents and specifically intended to allow residents to raise concerns. The Sailor and family may end the visit at any time and for any reason. If at any time during the visit, the team believes that the visit is unfolding in an unhelpful way, the team leader will end the visit and report back to the unit commander. Before departing the residence, the visit team will offer to address any issues raised during the visit and to commit to following up on the issue with the Sailor. For instances where a Sailor reveals issues in PPV or government housing but declines a visit, the command will assist the Sailor by contacting the installation commanding officer, executive officer, command master chief and housing director

Special considerations:

  • Be sensitive to privacy concerns. There may be Sailors and families who will feel a visit to their home is a violation of their privacy. We must respect this view. The goals and methods of home visitation must be presented in a positive manner to ensure families understand that the visits have been designed exclusively to ensure their health and safety and to promote their quality of life. Visits will only proceed with the informed consent of the Sailor (or adult family member living in the residence, if the Sailor is deployed). All commands will take measures to ensure that we build trust through this process.
  • There cannot be even the hint of retaliation or retribution. It should be the goal of every command that their Sailors bring these and other issues to their command leadership for resolution. Leadership, especially small unit leadership, should be eager to resolve these problems on behalf of their Sailors. These are often sensitive issues, often emotional, and each of us needs to adopt an attitude of seeking to understand and fix problems through frank and helpful conversations.
  • Leaders shall not attempt to be property managers, personal finance counselors or admin specialists. They need to stand side-by-side with the Sailor while engaging with the base CO and base housing office through existing processes if issues are raised.
  • For instances where a Sailor discloses issues with a private landlord not in PPV housing, you can help here too. Often, the best move is to direct the Sailor to meet with the local Region Legal Service Office who have legal assistance attorneys trained and experienced in local landlord-tenant law.

Unit commanders shall prepare implementation guidance required for visit teams from their command. Prior to beginning command visits, the cognizant staff judge advocate and/or offices of general counsel attorney shall be consulted.

No actions taken in support of this NAVADMIN shall replace business agreement manager responsibilities with regard to the ongoing execution of PPV operating agreements. Specifically, visit teams and commands shall not engage with PPV partners directly to ensure discrepancies are corrected. All necessary corrective actions shall be referred to installation commanders for action in accordance with existing approved procedures.

ISICs and TYCOMs shall ensure 100 percent of families of deployed commands are contacted and offered a visit. In all cases, visits shall be conducted no later than April 15.

Visits of residences aboard Army, Air Force and Marine Corps installations shall be recorded and issues referred from unit commanders to the respective host installation and passed as information to the appropriate regional commander area of responsibility.

CNIC and regional commands shall be available if requested to provide advice to installations and tenant commands on Family Housing policy, and associated legal concerns through April 15.

All home visitation records will be submitted to the designated representative of the unit commander, ISIC or TYCOM as appropriate.

Observations taken are not considered records for purposes of the Privacy Act, nor will the observations be made part of a system of records. However, all home visitation records will be handled and secured as if those records were personally identifiable information to protect the privacy of visited families.

All home visitation records will be destroyed no later than one year after the date of the home visit.

Observations recorded will not be used for the completion of evaluations and fitness reports.

CNIC is responsible for providing additional guidance and answering questions from commands in response to this NAVADMIN. Unit commanders shall address questions through host installations to the local regional commander prior to elevating issues and concerns to CNIC.

Unit commanders shall notify their chain of command when all Sailor-families have been contacted and when all visits are complete. Echelon Two commanders shall notify CNIC when 100 percent contact is achieved and when visits are complete. The master database for all PPV issues brought to leadership attention resides at the base housing office level, hence the importance of all issues being provided to the installation command and housing office team for tracking and resolution....it is essential that we strengthen the bonds of trust and confidence with our Sailors and their families.

I realize this is an intrusive “ask” for a lot of folks who are already doing a lot of important work. However, it is essential that we strengthen the bonds of trust and confidence with our Sailors and their families. Let’s get to it.

Editor’s note: This blog was adapted from NAVADMIN 043/19 that was released Feb. 23, 2019.


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Maintaining Trust of Our Sailors and Families Residing in Public Private Venture and Government Housing

Your Navy Operating Forward – Genkai Sea, Norwegian Sea, Philippine Sea

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NORWEGIAN SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 approaches for a landing aboard the command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), Oct. 27, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)



Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


NORWEGIAN SEA: Landing craft air cushion 84, assigned to Assault Craft Unit 4 and attached to the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21), transits the Norwegian Sea, Nov. 1, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Lydon Schwartz/Released)

GENKAI SEA: Sailors prepare to lower a float during a mine sweeping training evolution aboard the Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship USS Chief (MCM 14). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordan Crouch/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) transits the Mediterranean Sea, Oct. 30, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)

PHILIPPINE SEA: Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit 5, fast rope from an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter, assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat (HSC) 12, aboard the forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during exercise Keen Sword 19. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erwin Jacob V. Miciano/Released)

HELL, Norway: An M1A1 Abrams traverses a medium girder bridge assembled by Seabees from Navy Mobile Construction Battalion 1 and Marines from the 8th Engineer Support Battalion in Hell, Norway, during exercise Trident Juncture 2018, Oct. 21, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Jeffrey J. Pierce/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 28 approaches for a landing aboard the command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), Oct. 27, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Turner/Released)

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN: A Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine participates in Exercise Keen Sword with Submarine Group 7 and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Sailors and staff. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Electronics Technician (Radioman) Robert Gulini/Released)

NORTH SEA: The guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) fires its MK 45 5-inch gun as part of a live-fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Raymond Maddocks/Released)

PHILIPPINE SEA: Sailors perform preflight checks on an E/A-18G Growler on the flight deck of the forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during exercise Keen Sword 19, Nov. 1, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class MacAdam Kane Weissman/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) pulls alongside the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) for a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)

OKINAWA, Japan: Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Nayyaamunhotep Stubbs signals landing craft utility 1633 to approach the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) to receive equipment for Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) efforts off the coast of Okinawa, Japan, Oct. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Mortensen/Released)

ALVUND, Norway: Marines and Sailors offload light armored vehicles, attached to 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, from a landing craft air cushion in Alvund, Norway, during an amphibious landing in support of exercise Trident Juncture 2018, Oct. 30, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) pulls alongside the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) for a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph A.D. Phillips/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) fires its M45 5-inch gun as part of a live-fire exercise, Nov. 2, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist Matt Bodenner/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: The Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) transits the Alvund Fjord, Oct. 31, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kevin Leitner/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


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By Rear. Adm. Karl Thomas Commander, Task Force 70 This week, we wrapped up Keen …

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Your Navy Operating Forward – Genkai Sea, Norwegian Sea, Philippine Sea

Reno / Carson City Hosts Navy Week

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Coinciding with the Reno Rodeo, the sixth Navy Week celebration of 2018 hosted Sailors in Reno and Carson City, Nevada, June 18-24.  The primary purpose of the Navy Week program is to increase Navy awareness by presenting the Navy to Americans who live in cities that normally do not have a significant naval presence.  Both residents and Sailors interacted in a series of community outreach events providing the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand with a visible awareness the mission, capabilities and importance of the U.S. Navy.


The 32nd Street Brass Band entertains fans heading into the Reno Aces Ballpark as a part of Navy Week Reno/Carson City. (U.S. Navy photo by Musician 2nd Class Nina Church/Released)

Dr. Joe McConnell of the Desert Research Institute talks to Sailors and civilians from the U.S. Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command (METOC) about drilling for ice core samples to study the impact of humans on the environment. METOC is one of the many units in Reno for Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Christopher Hanson/Released)

Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Matt Ludwig, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 1, helps a child try on equipment from EODGRU-1 at Sparks Library in support of Reno/Carson City Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Abigayle Lutz/Released)

Navy Diver 2nd Class Keoni Chiles, from Volcano, Hawaii, listens to Harold Hilts, a Navy veteran at Renown Health’s Monaco Ridge during Reno/Carson City Navy Week. Hilts served on the USS Hornet (CV-12) as the rear radio operator on a Douglass SDB Dauntless dive bomber during World War II. He participated in several renowned campaigns, including the battle of Okinawa and the sinking of the Imperial Japanese Navy Battleship Yamato. Chiles, part of Southwestern Regional Maintenance Center out of San Diego, was one of many Sailors in town for Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Christopher Hanson/Released)

Aerographer’s Mate 1st Class Brett Myers, assigned to Fleet Weather Center-San Diego, joins chief meteorologist Mike Alger on KTVN Channel 2 News as part of Reno/Carson City Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Christopher Hanson/Released)

Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposal Matt Ludwig, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group 1, explains how to operate an iRobot 310 Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle at the Donald L. Carano Youth and Teen Facility in support of Reno/Carson City Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Abigayle Lutz/Released)

The U.S. Navy Band Southwest ensemble, 32nd Street Brass Band, performs at the weekly Feed the Camel hump day food truck bazaar. (U.S. Navy Photo by Musician Second Class Nina Church/Released)

Would you attend a Navy Week celebration near you ?


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Reno / Carson City Hosts Navy Week

Presidential Sailors

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On this President’s Day weekend, we’re taking a look at the Sailors who went from shipmates to presidents.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 16, 2018) A graphic illustration depicting the Presidents who have served in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Navy graphic by Kirsten Sisson/Released)
WASHINGTON (Feb. 16, 2018) A graphic illustration depicting the Presidents who have served in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Navy graphic by Kirsten Sisson/Released)


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Presidential Sailors

Judge Advocates, Then and Now

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By Rear Adm. John G. Hannink
Deputy Judge Advocate General of the Navy                                                                

Upon learning that the Navy’s Judge Advocate General’s (JAG) Corps is only 50 years old, most people express surprise.

One could be forgiven for assuming the JAG Corps has been around for far longer. Since its inception Dec. 8, 1967, the JAG Corps has been essential to naval operations. Furthermore, the scope and breadth of advice has grown since our Corps’ foundation, to the point that we’re at today – where our personnel advise clients across the globe on matters that range from the most sensitive national security decisions, to individual legal services, to Sailors in need of our assistance.

Indeed, Navy judge advocates have long captured the public’s imagination. I am still asked regularly about the “JAG” television show and few have forgotten Jack Nicholson and Tom Cruise sparring on the big screen in “A Few Good Men.” Their portrayals in popular culture have made judge advocates indelible symbols of naval service.

Some people also are surprised to learn that the first uniformed chief legal officer of the Navy was, in fact, a Marine. Col. William Butler Remey was assigned to the post in 1878 after convincing Congress that, like other branches of the military, the Navy needed a permanent JAG (e.g., the Navy had a “JAG” long before the JAG Corps).


GREAT LAKES, Ill. (February 8, 2016) – Lt. Kimberly Rios works on legal briefs for Naval Station Great Lakes Command Feb. 8. (U. S. Navy photo by Scott A. Thornbloom)

Remey actually argued that naval law was so unique that a line officer must serve as JAG. It wasn’t until 1950, nearly 75 years later, that the law required the JAG to be an attorney. In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed legislation that formalized the creation of the JAG Corps.

Today, a half-century later, the JAG Corps is a very different organization. It has evolved in countless ways to meet the demands of a growing military and a more interconnected and complex world.

Judge advocates are now ever-present fixtures at most naval commands. And yet, I wonder how many Sailors have a comprehensive understanding of the myriad ways judge advocates support them and the Navy mission.

It’s impossible to capture everything the JAG Corps does in a single blog post. It is perhaps best to highlight our three core practice areas – the three ways in which we touch Sailors and their families every day.


PORT LOUIS, Mauritius (Feb. 3, 2017) Cmdr. Andrew Wilkes, a legal advisor assigned to U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, discusses the implementation of a United Nations security council resolution with Geeandeo Cheetamun, Mauritian chief inspector of police during Exercise Cutlass Express 2017. The exercise is sponsored by U.S. Africa Command and conducted by U.S. Naval Forces Africa to assess and improve combined maritime law enforcement capacity and promote national and regional security in East Africa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Justin Stumberg/Released)

Our military justice team strives to help ensure good order and discipline, and protects the rights of all parties in judicial proceedings. Trial counsel, defense counsel, judges and victims legal counsel work tirelessly on behalf of Sailors and their families, and to protect the integrity of the military justice system.

Our operational lawyers provide commanders with accurate and responsive legal advice to support military operations and sound naval administration. We have attorneys specializing in maritime law, international law, environmental law and many other disciplines. Our judge advocates are on the cutting edge of many emerging issues, such as cyber warfare and special operations.

Do you need a will, help with your taxes or perhaps home-buying advice? Our legal assistance team supports the fleet by helping Sailors and their families resolve personal legal matters and to remain mission-ready. A judge advocate or civilian subject matter expert is standing by at any time to help Sailors with all their concerns and more.

Today, as it turns 50 years old, our JAG Corps is more versatile and more ingrained in naval operations than Remey, Johnson or any of the JAG Corps’ earliest members could have envisioned. Our judge advocates are making a meaningful impact on the Navy and on the lives of Sailors and their families. The future – the next 50 years – looks bright.


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Judge Advocates, Then and Now

Your Navy Operating Forward -Black Sea, Coral Sea, Bay of Bangal

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MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors prepare to launch an F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)



Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


CORAL SEA: The amphibious transport dock ship USS Green Bay (LPD 20) transits the Coral Sea during a replenishment-at-sea as part of Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Byron C. Linder/Released)

DJIBOUTI CITY, Djibouti: Members of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 1 maneuver into position for a harbor security mission in Djibouti City, Djibouti. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Natalia Murillo/Released)

BLACK SEA: The Tioconderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) fires its Mark 86 5-inch gun during a live-fire gunnery exercise in conjunction with exercise Sea Breeze 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua M. Tolbert/Released)

CORAL SEA: The amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), right, transits alongside the Henry J. Kaiser-class fleet replenishment oiler USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) during a replenishment-at-sea during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Gavin Shields/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors prepare to launch an F/A-18F Super Hornet attached to the “Blacklions” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213 from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Matlage/Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) transits the Bay of Bengal during Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Craig Z. Rodarte/Released)

ARTA BEACH, Djibouti: Sailors attached to Beach Master Unit 2 aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) prepare to enter the well deck while embarked on a landing craft unit attached to Assault Craft Unit 4. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raymond Minami/Released)

SHOALWATER BAY, Australia: Sailors launch Landing Craft Utility (LCU) 1651, assigned to Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7, from the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48) to deliver supplies to Marines attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) on shore as part of a large-scale amphibious assault during Talisman Saber 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/Released)

BLACK SEA: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) fires its Mark 45 5-inch lightweight gun while operating with the Ukrainian Border Guard anti-submarine corvette Hryhoriy Kuropyatnykov (BG 50) during exercise Sea Breeze 2017 in the Black Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Andre Pangkerego guides an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter on the flight deck aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Ray Nunez Jr./Released)

BAY OF BENGAL: Sailors aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59) conduct a replenishment-at-sea during Malabar 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey J. Hockenberger/Released)

ODESSA, Ukraine: The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66) and the Turkish navy frigate TCG Turgutreis (F 241) depart Odessa, Ukraine, for the at-sea phase of exercise Sea Breeze 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Weston Jones/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


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Your Navy Operating Forward -Black Sea, Coral Sea, Bay of Bangal

Team Navy Competes at 2017 DOD Warrior Games

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Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Team Navy at the 2017 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Chicago.

Team Navy is comprised of 36 Sailors and four Coast Guardsmen who are competing June 30 to July 8 against other military teams to compete for gold, silver and bronze medals in archery, cycling, field, shooting, sitting volleyball, swimming, track and wheelchair basketball.

This is first time the Navy has hosted the Games and is the first time they have been held in a public venue since the DoD became involved in hosting the Games in 2010.

Roster Sports Schedule

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6

Follow this blog throughout the Games for the latest on Team Navy.

Day 6 (July 6)

Cycling

Day 5 (July 5)

Field

Day 4 (July 3)

Archery

Day 3 (July 2)

Track

Day 2 (July 1)

Opening Ceremony

Warrior Games Opening Ceremony

It’s time for the 2017 Warrior Games in Chicago opening ceremony with Jon Stewart. 39 Sailors are participating in the Paralympic-style completion for wounded, ill and injured service members in Chicago. Go Navy!

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, July 1, 2017

CHICAGO (July 1, 2017) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and his wife Dana Richardson cheer during the Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games’ opening ceremony at Soldier Field in Chicago. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Chief Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
CHICAGO (July 1, 2017) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and his wife Dana Richardson cheer during the Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games’ opening ceremony at Soldier Field in Chicago. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Chief Elliott Fabrizio/Released)

Sitting Volleyball

LIVE NOW: Team Navy competing against United States Air Force in sitting volleyball at Warrior Games, a Paralympic-style competition, against other military branches, the United Kingdom and Australia for wounded, ill and injured service members. Go Navy!

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, July 1, 2017

Rifle

Day 1 (June 30)

Team Navy Kicks Off 2017 Warrior Games

Warrior Games Day 1

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games got underway today in Chicago.Watch for a look at Team Navy’s competition in shooting, wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball on Day 1.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Friday, June 30, 2017

Team Navy kicked off the annual Department of Defense Warrior Games June 30 in Chicago, Illinois, with competition in shooting, wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball.

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Archery

Shooting

Wheelchair Basketball

About Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor Adaptive Sports and Recreation Program

The mission of the Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor Adaptive Sports and Recreation Program is to deliver year-round competitive and recreation opportunities for wounded, ill or seriously injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. Adaptive sports — athletic activities that are modified to meet the abilities of injured or ill individuals — are essential to the recuperation of our wounded warriors. All enrollees in Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor are encouraged to make athletics a key component of their recovery and rehabilitation plans. The proven and lasting benefits of adaptive sports and reconditioning activities include higher self-esteem, lower stress levels and fewer secondary medical conditions.

Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor hosts a series of adaptive athletic reconditioning camps, provides information relative to recreational opportunities and facilitates enrollees’ participation in the annual Department of Defense Warrior Games. Non-medical care managers and recovery care coordinators, along with the transition coordinators, are encouraged to brief all recovering and transitioning service members about adaptive sports opportunities.

Once registered for the sports program, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen are provided with information on all athletic opportunities, including the annual trials where athletes can compete for a spot on Team Navy in the DoD Warrior Games. Participants in the trials include active-duty service members and veterans with upper-body, lower-body and spinal cord injuries; serious illnesses; traumatic brain injuries; amputations; visual impairment; and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Athletes possessing professionalism, team spirit and the best qualifying times and/or scores are selected to compete on Team Navy in the DoD Warrior Games. The DoD Warrior Games represent the culmination of participation in structured adaptive sports and reconditioning activities of wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans throughout their recovery by encouraging participation in physical and cognitive activities, inspiring physical fitness, mental strength and peer support, and encouraging new opportunities for growth and achievement.


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Team Navy Competes at 2017 DOD Warrior Games