Diving with Sharks

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Shark-Panel-croppedIn honor of Shark Week, we’ve compiled some interesting facts about the Defense Department’s ties to sharks.

Fact #2:

Navy divers spend some of their time getting into SHARK tanks in aquariums around the country…on purpose! The Navy’s community relations efforts send sailors out into communities that don’t have a large Navy presence so that those communities can understand what their country’s sea service can and does do every day. This type of public engagement – including diving into shark tanks at your local aquarium – is crucial to engendering trust and confidence with our fellow Americans in their all volunteer force.

Want to know more about Navy divers? Here is their job description from the Navy:

As a Navy Diver, you will be part of an extraordinary brotherhood. You will journey anywhere from the darkest depths of the world’s oceans to freezing arctic-like conditions underneath icebergs. Accomplishing a number of tasks only few can perform. All with the focus to achieve.

In this role you can expect to:

  • Perform a variety of diving salvage operations and special diving duties worldwide
  • Take part in construction and demolition projects
  • Execute search and rescue missions
  • Support military and civilian law enforcement agencies
  • Serve as the technical experts for diving evolutions for numerous military Special Operations units
  • Provide security, communications and other logistics during Expeditionary Warfare missions
  • Carry out routine ship maintenance, including restoration and repair

Your strength and determination will prove you are anything but a typical diver.

Editor’s Note: “Dive in shark tanks” has been submitted as a revision to this job description via the U.S. Navy.

Have you seen a Navy diver in a tank near you? Share your story in the comments section below!

Today’s photos all come to us with the same caption:
Navy Master Chief Diver Joe Howard answers questions from the crowd while “swimming” with the sharks at the Newport, Ky., Aquarium, Sept. 1, 2011, during Cincinnati Navy Week 2011.  (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Davis Anderson/Released)

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Diving with Sharks

Summer Safety

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Story by Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bryan Niegel, Defense Media Activity

Summertime: my favorite time of the year!!! The time of the year when you can hang out with friends and family outside grilling food and sipping on your favorite ice cold beverage. To me, summertime means a lot of things: toes in the sand, the bright warm sun, pools and beaches.

Additionally, summertime is the time of the year when all the branches in the U.S. military give their safety briefs. If you have never had the pleasure, they are everything you could imagine. It’s typical meeting where someone is standing in front of you lecturing you (usually with a power point in the background) about what you should and shouldn’t do during your leisure time.

 

Photo: Walter Fulton, a contract safety instructor trainer with Cape Fox Professional Services, discusses summer driving safety at the Naval District Washington summer safety stand down at the Washington Navy Yard on May 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Patrick Gordon/Released)

Walter Fulton, a contract safety instructor trainer with Cape Fox Professional Services, discusses summer driving safety at the Naval District Washington summer safety stand down at the Washington Navy Yard on May 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Patrick Gordon/Released)

Earlier in my service as a young sailor I used to dread these lectures and wondered why we had to attend them. Most of them were so boring it would be hard to stay awake through the entire brief. As time has went on in my career I have learned that the regulations and guidance you get in the military has sadly been written in blood.

Summer time is a heightened time of year for injuries and even deaths. Service members spend more time outside and in the water participating in activities from sitting on a beach in the sun to taking personal watercraft or motorcycle for a joy ride. These activities greaten the risk of service members of injuring themselves or even becoming a casualty.

To help try to avoid these injuries each service has adapted their own way of getting the message out to play safe.

The Army seems to be ahead of the curve on this…for once (just kidding soldiers, I love all my fellow service members and their associated branches). It seems like they are trying to make this training more enjoyable by implementing games and interactive online videos with informative messages embedded to appeal to the younger (and even some older, mine included) generations love of video games. In the name of research (wink) I tested them all out myself and they’re actually not bad. One even emulated and old favorite of mine (can you guess which one?).

The Navy and Marines are keeping it simple with the standard power points and safety videos.

Air force has a program called The Critical Days of Summer which has a week by week rundown on training for 14 weeks with useful links for more information.

All of the services have a similar message. They want service members to have a good time and enjoy your time off of work, but in a safe manner while still maintaining their core values.

You can view more DoD Summer Safety videos here

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Summer Safety

Army Freedom File Update

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With the war in Afghanistan starting to be controlled by Afghan troops, American troops train them in proper tactics, and techniques to keep them and civilians safe.

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Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD website.

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Army Freedom File Update

Worth A Thousand Words: I Got Your Back

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Photo: Sailors prepare to attach pallets to an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter assigned to the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 49 during a vertical replenishment on the flight deck of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) on July 7, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Kelly/ Released)

Sailors prepare to attach pallets to an SH-60B Seahawk helicopter assigned to the “Island Knights” of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 49 during a vertical replenishment on the flight deck of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) on July 7, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Kelly/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: I Got Your Back

Worth A Thousand Words: Focusing on the Mission Ahead

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Photo: A U.S. Army paratrooper assigned to the 20th Engineer Brigade focuses on his mission prior to jumping out of a C-130H Hercules aircraft during a Joint Operational Access Exercise (JOAX) at Fort Bragg, N.C., on June 26, 2013. JOAX was designed to enhance cohesiveness between U.S. Army, Air Force and allied personnel, allowing the services an opportunity to properly execute large-scale heavy equipment and troop movement. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Richardson.A U.S. Army paratrooper assigned to the 20th Engineer Brigade focuses on his mission prior to jumping out of a C-130H Hercules aircraft during a Joint Operational Access Exercise (JOAX) at Fort Bragg, N.C., on June 26, 2013. JOAX was designed to enhance cohesiveness between U.S. Army, Air Force and allied personnel, allowing the services an opportunity to properly execute large-scale heavy equipment and troop movement. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Richardson)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Focusing on the Mission Ahead

Reserve F-16 Pilot Helps Squelch Wildfires Across West

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A small and maneuverable Beech King Air, like the one flown by Lt. Col. Paul Delmonte while on the job with the U.S. Forest Service, pulls away after leading a tanker to a retardant drop spot over a wildfire. During peak fire season, May to October, forest service lead plane pilots can assist in putting out as many as 60 fires. (Courtesy photo)

By Kari Tilton
419th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Air Force Reserve F-16 pilot Lt. Col. Paul “Buster” Delmonte flies several types of aircraft as part of his full-time civilian job, but instead of dropping bombs he delivers an entirely different kind of weapon.

Delmonte, the 466th Fighter Squadron commander, is an aerial firefighter and aviation safety manager with the U.S. Forest Service. Between May and October each year, he flies above fiery mountain ranges to drop smokejumpers and direct the delivery of fire retardant.

He’s currently in Durango, Colo. with more than 1,400 forest service personnel to extinguish the West Fork Complex Fire, which as of today has consumed more than 83,000 acres. He’s also working alongside Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard aircrews deployed there with specially equipped C-130s that are dropping thousands of gallons of retardant on the blazing wilderness area.

Just like flying in a combat zone, conditions above wildfires are often rough and the drop zones are always challenging.

“Typically, we drop the smokejumpers over tight clearings in the forest canopy,” Delmonte said. “It takes about 30 minutes to empty the plane and it can be challenging to maneuver through narrow canyons while steering clear of trees and other obstacles.”

“If the fire is big, often times smoke combined with the angle of the sun will make it extremely difficult to see,” he added.

When transporting smokejumpers, Delmonte flies either a DHC-6 or DC3-TP aircraft. Both are known for their ability to fly at slow speeds and in tight circles. The smokejumpers jump from the aircraft, parachuting into rugged terrain to reach areas that are hard to access by road.

When fire retardant is the weapon of choice, Delmonte flies as “lead plane” in a Beech King Air, a smaller, highly maneuverable aircraft. His role is to orchestrate the location and timing for large forest service tankers to drop the retardant, foam or water.

“We have a smoke generator onboard – similar to airshow aircraft – so we can mark the start point and designate the best course for the tankers,” Delmonte said. “Piloting the lead plane is much like being an F-16 FAC-A (forward air control – airborne). I get the objectives and priorities from the ground incident commander and then go to work sequencing other aircraft over the target.”

The forest service can send Delmonte anywhere in the U.S., but he typically covers hot spots in the western U.S. like New Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and California where wildfires are most common in the hot, dry summer months.

During a busy season, a lead plane pilot can assist in putting out as many as 60 fires, he said. So far this year, he’s been called to New Mexico, California, Idaho and Colorado.

But with weather reports calling for a record-setting heat wave across the western U.S. this weekend, things are likely just warming up.

“I expect I’ll get busier real soon, as July and August are typically our biggest months,” he said.

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Reserve F-16 Pilot Helps Squelch Wildfires Across West

Joint Strike Fighter F-35C CF-6 Ferry & Arrival

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The first U.S. Navy-owned Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II carrier variant (CV) arrived at its new home with the Navy’s Strike Fighter Squadron 101 (VFA) in Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

The arrival of this first jet fighter is just one of many to come. Strike Fighter Squadron 101 is set to be the replacement squadron with the F-35C Lightning II CV, whom will train both pilots and maintainers.

But, what’s so special about this aircraft? You can find out here!

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Joint Strike Fighter F-35C CF-6 Ferry & Arrival

Worth A Thousand Words: Bubble Up

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Photo: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Charles Linder, assigned to Commander Task Group 56.1, and a sailor from the Royal Jordanian Navy surface after placing a charge for an underwater detonation during Exercise Eager Lion. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Wyatt Huggett/Released)

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Charles Linder, assigned to Commander Task Group 56.1, and a Royal Jordanian Navy sailor surface after placing a charge for an underwater detonation during Exercise Eager Lion on June 13, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Wyatt Huggett/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Bubble Up

Easing Children’s Stress During PCS Season

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[unable to retrieve full-text content]Permanent change of station transitions can be tough for military children. This blog provides steps military families can take to make it a smooth transition for their children.
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Easing Children’s Stress During PCS Season