Rating Modernization: Advancement Process

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By Rear Adm. John Nowell

Rating Modernization is the future of the growing workforce in the Navy. In August we released NAVADMIN 196/18 which provided an update on those four lines of effort and this is the fourth of a total of five blog posts that will talk about the updates to Rating Modernization. We also have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that mirror the blogs we will be sharing with you.

In 2017 we gave commands the ability to reinstate an E3 Sailor to E4 who had been awarded NJP, after a six month waiting period. We also eliminated E4 advancement exams for 20 ratings where Sailors auto-advance, which helps to reduce administrative burden.


BELL GARDENS, Calif. (Feb. 10, 2019) Reserve component Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Los Angeles take advancement exams in the drill hall at NOSC Los Angeles.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Pyoung K. Yi/Released)

Then, late in 2017, Navy senior enlisted leaders completed the first phase of the Advancement Exam Readiness Review (AERR) testing bank improvement plan by drafting advancement exam questions that match current and relevant rating-specific technical requirements with the hands-on, real-world knowledge and experience needed in the fleet.

The establishment of the Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam (PMK-EE) focuses the Navy Wide Advancement Exam (NWAE) on occupational knowledge and will serve as an eligibility requirement for advancement to pay grades E4/5/6/7. PMK-EE is delivered electronically and is available via the MyNavyPortal (MNP) website.


PEARL HARBOR (Jan. 16, 2019) Sailors review promotional materials for the MyNavy Career Development Symposium at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Riggs/Released)

The online Enlisted Advancement Worksheet (EAW), will automate the manual advancement processes and enable Sailors to review their worksheets before the exam and take charge of their advancement records. An EAW pilot, is available through the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS), for the Active Duty and Reserve spring 2019 advancement cycles.

The Senior Enlisted Advancement to Vacancy (A2V) pilot was announced in June and will fill senior chief petty officer and master chief petty officer priority billets using a spot advancement incentive, and will lead enlisted advancement modernization for exceptional Sailors in all pay grades with critical NECs in the future.

Don’t forget to check out our podcasts! We have a series of six Rating Modernization podcasts that accompany this blog series.

Editor’s note: Sailor 2025 is the Navy’s program to more effectively recruit, develop, manage, reward and retain the force of tomorrow. It consists of approximately 45 living, breathing initiatives and is built on a framework of three pillars – a modern personnel system, a career learning continuum and career readiness.


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Rating Modernization: Advancement Process

Four Things You Need to Know About Strengthening the Culture of Operational Excellence

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From U.S. Navy

Recently, we released our one-year update on the Readiness Reform Oversight Committee’s work to make our Navy a safer and more combat-effective force that places the safety, readiness and training of our people first. The update covered a lot of ground, so we’re sharing the four things that you need to know about strengthening the culture of operational excellence:

  1. Empower transparent, data-driven decision-making at every echelon of command as foundational for achieving sustainable readiness. Safety and combat readiness are never mutually exclusive – rather, they are synonymous in the unforgiving medium of the sea.
  2. Invigorate and continually reinforce our culture of mission command, preserving the commanding officer’s ability to execute with initiative, creativity and clarity, while inspiring the best ideas from every rate and rank.
  3. Continue to improve and modernize naval talent management, maintenance and all training systems – both digital and hands-on – towards their maximum potential.
  4. Place our Sailors and our Navy families at the forefront of our efforts to create a dominant naval force that produces outstanding leaders and teams, armed with the best equipment and continually able to learn and adapt faster than our rivals.
ARABIAN GULF (Feb. 21, 2019) Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) observe as the ship pulls alongside the Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) before a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob Milham/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Feb. 21, 2019) Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) observe as the ship pulls alongside the Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) before a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jacob Milham/Released)

Here are examples of our ongoing efforts:

  • Armor Up (Surface Warfare Officers School Toughness Initiative): Beginning in July 2019, SWOS is adding an additional two weeks to the Surface Commander Course focusing on stress inoculation, coping skills and significant additional simulator time.
  • Updated Manning Models: An Afloat Work Week study found 4 percent fewer productive hours available than expected on ships conducting operations at sea, resulting in a requirement for an additional 1,400 billets across the fleet. A follow-up study currently underway, including Condition V watch requirements and in port work requirements, is expected to yield similar results.
  • Human Factors Expertise: Human Factors Engineers have been incorporated into TYCOM staffs in support of optimizing training/assessment processes and enhancing operational safety analysis. The presence of Embedded Mental Health (EMH) professionals is being enhanced across all fleet concentration areas; to date, 33 additional EMH billets (17 officer, nine enlisted and seven civilian) have been validated by the Bureau of Naval Medicine (BUMED) and funded across the Future Years Defense Program.
  • Integrated Industry Lessons in Support of Team Effectiveness: A new learning culture steering group, led by a Navy Reserve three-star admiral who is also a Fortune 500 executive, conducted comparative analysis spanning 30 companies, 15 Navy commands and the feedback of 25 culture experts in order to spearhead progress toward a learning culture that maximizes individual and team performance. This analysis will inform future RROC initiatives supporting a growing culture of excellence.

Quartermaster Seaman Apprentice Jacob Overturf, from Las Vegas, Nev., stands watch in the bridge of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Lasheba James/Released)

One year in, it would be naïve to believe we are close to completing RROC’s work. However, due to the efforts of many professionals around the fleet, we are currently safe to operate and a more effective Navy than we were a year ago. But the hard work has only just begun. We can influence behavior in the short term through policy; we can only change the culture with sustained commitment to integrity, transparency and excellence in all that we do, at every level. This will remain, in every way, a team effort.

We owe our best to our shipmates, both the ones who we lost and the ones we serve alongside every day, around the world, in the unforgiving business of our nation’s defense.

Editor’s note: Follow related Navy Live blog content using tag RROC.


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Four Things You Need to Know About Strengthening the Culture of Operational Excellence

SECNAV Spencer’s 243rd Marine Corps Birthday Message

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By Richard V. Spencer
Secretary of the Navy

To our Marines, civilians, families, and friends:

For 243 years, United States Marines have set the standard for military excellence, ready to respond at any time, in any place, whenever there is a need.

One hundred years ago, the enemy called them the Devil Dogs for the way they turned the tide at Belleau Wood. Seventy-five years ago, the shores and jungles of Tarawa shook with the determined charge of United States Marines. And fifty years ago, Marines like Gunnery Sergeant John Canley imposed order on the chaotic urban battlefield of Hue.

WASHINGTON (Oct. 18, 2018) Retired U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. John L. Canley, the 300th Marine Medal of Honor recipient, gives closing remarks at the Pentagon. From Jan. 31 to Feb. 6, 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam, Canley, the company gunnery sergeant assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, took command of the company, led multiple attacks against enemy-fortified positions, rushed across fire-swept terrain despite his own wounds, and carried wounded Marines into Hue City, including his commanding officer, in order to relieve friendly forces who were surrounded. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Daisha R. Johnson/Released)
WASHINGTON (Oct. 18, 2018) Retired U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. John L. Canley, the 300th Marine Medal of Honor recipient, gives closing remarks at the Pentagon. From Jan. 31 to Feb. 6, 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam, Canley, the company gunnery sergeant assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, took command of the company, led multiple attacks against enemy-fortified positions, rushed across fire-swept terrain despite his own wounds, and carried wounded Marines into Hue City, including his commanding officer, in order to relieve friendly forces who were surrounded. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Daisha R. Johnson/Released)

It was my honor to meet now Sergeant Major Canley (retired) and to add his name to the Hall of Valor following his receipt of the Congressional Medal of Honor. It was a reminder of the service and sacrifice of the unbroken line of patriots, from its beginning in the earliest days of the revolution, through the Marines it was my honor to serve alongside, to the warriors who stand watch throughout the globe today.

Polly and I are forever grateful for all that you, your families, and your loved ones do for our nation. Because of your hard work and dedication, the foundation for restoring readiness and increasing lethality has been set. But as we enter our 244th year of service, we must now build on that foundation with a committed sense of urgency. We are accountable for how and where we invest our time and our resources, and we must understand the readiness and lethality we gain from those investments.

Solve the problems in front of you. Send solutions up the chain, and empower those you command to do the same. Ask yourselves and each other how can we accomplish our mission better, faster, and more efficiently. With your help, I have no doubt we will leverage every resource, leading practice, and efficiency we can find with the professionalism, integrity, and accountability the American people have come to expect from the Corps after 243 years of honor and valor.

Happy Birthday, Marines. God bless you, God bless the United States Marine Corps, and God bless the United States of America. Semper Fi.


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SECNAV Spencer’s 243rd Marine Corps Birthday Message

Getting from Vulnerable to Cyber Secure

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By George Bieber
Naval Information Forces Public Affairs

We are in the cyber fight 24/7. Ransomware attacks, identity theft and online credit card fraud can be devastating, and these are just a few of the many types of malicious software and network attacks. If you’ve never been the victim of a breach, consider yourself lucky, but don’t let your luck lead you to complacency.

Below are tips recommended by military and private sector computer experts to better protect your personal information online:

  • Install an antivirus and update it.
    Antivirus software and updates are automatically covered at our worksites by Naval Information Forces’ Information Technicians (IT) Sailors at numerous commands around the globe and Navy/Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) via Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM). For your computers at home, download antivirus software, which will help protect your computer against viruses and malware.
  • Explore security tools you install.
    Many excellent apps and settings help protect your devices and your identity, but they’re only valuable if you know how to use them properly. Ensure your antivirus is configured and working correctly.
  • Use unique passwords for each account.
    One of the easiest ways hackers steal information is by getting a batch of username and password combinations from one source and trying those same combinations elsewhere. The single best way to prevent one data breach from having a domino effect is to use strong, unique passwords for every online account, preferably featuring 14 characters that combine upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.
  • Get a VPN and use it.
    Any time you connect to the nternet using a Wi-Fi network that you don’t recognize, use a virtual private network, or VPN. A VPN hides your IP address and encrypts your internet traffic, providing enhanced online security to the user.
  • Use two-factor authentication.
    Two-factor authentication means you need to pass another layer of authentication other than a password. This could include a fingerprint, facial recognition or a text. If the data or personal information in an account is sensitive or valuable, and the account offers two-factor authentication, you should enable it.
  • Use passcodes.
    Use a passcode lock on every smart device to protect your personal data. Many smartphones offer a four-digit PIN by default. Set a strong passcode, not an obvious four-digit PIN such as 1-4, last four digits of a Social Security Number, birthday or phone number.
  • Use different email addresses for different accounts.
    Consider maintaining one email address dedicated to signing up for apps that you want to try, but which might have questionable security, or which might spam you with promotional messages. After you’ve vetted a service or app, sign up using one of your permanent email accounts. If the dedicated account starts to get spam, close it and create a new one.
  • Clear your cache.
    To better protect that information that may be lurking in your web history, be sure to delete browser cookies and clear your browser history on a regular basis. To clear your cache, simply press Ctrl+Shift+Del to bring up a dialog that lets you choose which elements of browser data you want to clear.
  • Turn off the ‘save password’ feature in browsers.
    When you install a third-party password manager, it typically offers to import your password from the browser’s storage. If password managers can do that, you can be sure some malicious software can do the same.
  • Don’t fall prey to click bait.
    Click bait doesn’t just refer to cat compilation videos and catchy headlines. It can also include links in email, messaging apps and on social media sites. Phishing links masquerade as secure websites, hoping to trick you into giving them your credentials. Drive-by download pages can cause malware to automatically download and infect your device. Don’t click links in emails or text messages unless they come from a trusted source, and even then you should exercise caution.
  • Protect your social media privacy.
    Make sure you’ve configured each social media site so that your posts aren’t public. Think twice before revealing too much in a post, since your friends might share it with others. With care, you can retain your privacy without losing the entertainment and connections of social media.

Following these simple guidelines will help decrease your vulnerability in the cyber battlespace, and ensure that your personal data is better protected.


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Aegis Integration and Wayne E. Meyer

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By Rear Adm. Brian Fort
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

On Sept. 13, we welcomed USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) to her new homeport here at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.


The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) and its crew arrive to their new homeport at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Corwin M. Colbert/Released)

USS Wayne E. Meyer is named for Rear Adm. Meyer, considered the father of Aegis, our Navy’s centralized, automated, command-and-control radar and computerized weapon control system. It’s the Navy’s universal – and integrated – computerized system aboard our guided-missile cruisers and destroyers, including USS Wayne E. Meyer.

Brought to life by Meyer and his team in the early 70s, the Aegis combat system is able to detect threats from all around our ships – as many as 250 targets at the same time. Aegis can detect enemy threats in the air nearly 300 miles away.


Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer, USN (covered)

Our leaders, from the chief of naval operations to the fleet and type commanders, remind us we steam today in a fast-paced, complex and frequently uncertain world. It’s a world with evolving threats and unpredictable potential adversaries. That’s one reason we can be extremely grateful for the steady and extremely capable Aegis system.

Meyer developed the system while director of surface warfare at the then-new Naval Sea Systems Command. It was just at the end of the Vietnam War but still in the heat of the Cold War, when Meyer brought together a team of top-notch engineers, his “true believers” – STEM volunteers who were willing to stake their reputations on making Aegis a reality.

Meyers integrated women on his team because he saw their skills and ability as well as their determination as members of his team.


Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) fire a Mark 38 25mm machine gun system during a live-fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kelsey L. Adams/Released)

He and his volunteers believed in the mission, and their hard work paid off for generations who followed.

The women and men aboard the USS Wayne E. Meyer are also volunteers – professionals who can lead, serve with integrity, rise to a challenge together and critically self-assess their performance. They are committed to continuous improvement and warfighting readiness in service to our nation.

Over the past two years DDG-108 conducted two deployments to the western Pacific, leading the fight for the Carl Vinson Strike Group. In 2017, USS Wayne E. Meyer served as air and missile defense Commander to ensure the safety of the strike group for its six-month deployment. During the 2017 deployment, DDG-108 conducted exercises and drills with key allied partners, the Republic of Korea Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.


The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), foreground, transits the East China Sea with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Murasame-class destroyer JS Samidare (DD 106), right, and the aircraft USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70).  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)

In March 2018, USS Wayne E. Meyer and USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) made a historic port visit to Da Nang, Vietnam – the first time a U.S. aircraft carrier visited the country since the end of the Vietnam War in 1973. That was the same year coincidentally – 45 years ago –  that Meyer and his team installed Aegis installed aboard the first test ship, USS Norton Sound (AVM 1).


Sailors assigned to Carl Vinson Strike Group participate in stilt walking during a visit to SOS Children’s Village as part of a community service event during a port visit in Da Nang, Vietnam. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel P. Jackson Norgart/Released)

Today, our Navy continues to develop, test and deploy innovative systems on our ships here in the Pacific, including those on the Pearl Harbor waterfront. Aegis continues to evolve as well, embracing new changes in technology. Increasingly, we are also embracing the potential and need for Aegis Ashore.

With the arrival of USS Wayne E. Meyer, named for the “father of Aegis,” to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, we see a dedicated commitment to integrating and maintaining the most technologically advanced ships in the Pacific with updated and advanced capabilities.

I join with the rest of our region/MIDPAC team in welcoming – and integrating – the Sailors and families of USS Wayne E. Meyer as the newest member in our ohana.

Editor’s note: This is the eleventh in a series of namesake blogs by Rear Adm. Brian Fort highlighting the surface ships homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.


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Navy Week Held in Fargo

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Sailors assigned to USS Constitution teach Lisa Budeau and Jordan Schroeer, news anchors for North Dakota Today, how to tie knots during Fargo Navy Week. Fargo, N.D. is one of select cities to host a 2018 Navy Week, a week dedicated to raising U.S. Navy awareness through local outreach, community service, and exhibitions. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)



Navy Week Fargo was held July 23-29 in conjunction with the Fargo Air Show to increase exposure and allow our Sailors to showcase our mission, capabilities and achievements of the U.S. Navy. Navy Weeks serve as a principal outreach effort into areas of the country without a significant Navy presence to provide residents the opportunity to meet Sailors firsthand.  


Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Cory Van Beveren, from Countryside, Ill., assigned to USS Constitution, teaches a child how to tie knots at Bennett Boys & Girls Club during Fargo Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Engineman 2nd Class Jamie Vetter, assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Fargo, watches the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, practice demonstration during Fargo Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David R. Finley Jr./Released)

A child at the Fargo Public Library conducts the Navy Band Great Lakes ceremonial band during their performance at Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Sailors assigned to USS Constitution teach Lisa Budeau and Jordan Schroeer, news anchors for North Dakota Today, how to tie knots during Fargo Navy Week. Fargo, N.D. is one of select cities to host a 2018 Navy Week, a week dedicated to raising U.S. Navy awareness through local outreach, community service, and exhibitions. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Casey Scoular/Released)

Musician 3rd Class Danlie Cuenca, assigned to Navy Band Great Lakes, performs at a free concert held at the Fargo Theater during the 2018 Fargo Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kleynia R. McKnight/Released)

Construction Electrician 2nd Class Benjamin Phelps, assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Fargo, helps a student program her robot at Minnesota State University Moorhead’s College for Kids summer camp during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David R. Finley Jr./Released)

Lt. Mack Jamieson, from Fulton, Miss., assigned to the Navy Office of Community Outreach, takes a selfie with children from the YMCA and local Boys & Girls Clubs at Island Park in Fargo, N.D., during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Dr. Tim Mahoney, mayor of Fargo, N.D., poses for a photo after performing a jump with the U.S. Navy parachute team, the Leap Frogs, during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Musician 1st Class Aaron Deaton, from Parkersburg, W.Va., assigned to Navy Band Great Lakes, plays taps during a wreath-laying ceremony for the members of the Gato-class submarine USS Robalo (SS-273) during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Lt. Monica Killoran, and Ensign Keaton Brenneman, assigned to Naval Oceanography Operations Command, help Cambrie Wickham pull the cord to launch a water bottle rocket science project at the Minnesota State University Moorhead College for Kids and Teens Camp during Fargo Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kleynia R. McKnight/Released)

Navy Diver 2nd Class Joseph Sarge, from Redding, Pa., assigned to Southwest Regional Maintenance Center, talks to children in the YMCA and local Boys & Girls Clubs while wearing a bomb disposal suit at Island Park in Fargo, N.D., during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Rear Adm. Gene F. Price, commander of Naval Information Force Reserve, tours the North Dakota State University Research and Creative Activity Center during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Rear Adm. Gene F. Price, commander of Naval Information Force Reserve, meets with the mayors of Dilworth, Minn., Fargo, N.D., West Fargo, N.D., and Moorhead, Minn., during Fargo-Moorhead Metro Navy Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Anthony/Released)

Would you attend a Navy Week celebration near you ?


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Forged and Ready: Chung-Hoon Legacy

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By Rear Adm. Brian Fort
Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

Those who adapt can overcome.

Consider the namesake of our Pearl Harbor-homeported USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93), Rear Adm. Gordon Paiea Chung-Hoon.

Forged from the sea and seasoned in war, Chung-Hoon was a lieutenant assigned to USS Arizona (BB 39), Dec. 7, 1941. He was on a weekend pass that Sunday when Oahu was attacked and his ship was sunk.

In 1942, Chung-Hoon served aboard the light cruiser USS Honolulu (CL 48) and participated in some of the fiercest fighting in the war in the South Pacific, including in the Solomons.

Gordor Pai'ea Chung-Hoon
Gordor Pai’ea Chung-Hoon

In 1944, Chung-Hoon took command of USS Sigsbee (DD 502), a destroyer assigned with Carrier Task Force 58 off the coast of Japan.

On April 14, 1945, Sigsbee – along with seven Fletcher Class destroyers, steamed to picket stations, making them prime targets for nearly two dozen kamikaze (“divine wind”) suicide planes that attacked their ships.

One kamikaze got through Sigsbee’s fierce antiaircraft guns, missed the bridge, but smashed into the ship’s stern. The massive explosion destroyed a big section of the stern, knocked out the port engine and steering, and caused flooding in the aft third of the ship. In the midst of the chaos, Skipper Chung-Hoon’s loud voice came through, according to one witness: “Steady, gang.”

He led the crew in response to the attack, jettisoning damaged equipment and personally leading a repair crew to assess damage and seal and shore the after solid bulkhead. Twenty-two Sailors were killed that day, and 75 were wounded.

Chung-Hoon rose to the challenge in a crisis. He adapted, overcame and persevered. Rather than abandoning his damaged ship, he chose to save it and the Sailors he led. His Sailors kept up a steady rate of “prolonged and effective gunfire,” as described in his Navy Cross citation.

Today, USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) continues to build on their namesake’s legacy of toughness and sustainability. In the last two years, DDG-93 won the Secretary of the Navy Safety Excellence Award for afloat units, a Battle “E,” and a Green “H.”

PHILIPPINE SEA (March 29, 2016) Sailors from supply department aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) form an "E" on the flight deck to commemorate their earning of the Supply "Blue E" award. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)
PHILIPPINE SEA (March 29, 2016) Sailors from supply department aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) form an “E” on the flight deck to commemorate their earning of the Supply “Blue E” award. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)

Sailors aboard USS Chung-Hoon are excelling in performance, and it shows in promotions. Three Sailors were picked up for officer programs in 2017, and this year one senior chief frocked to master chief, five chiefs to senior chief, and 28 petty officers frocked to their next paygrade.

Last month, Chung-Hoon completed their naval surface fire support. Undersea warfare self-assessments will soon be underway executing their final certifications.

Most importantly, Chung-Hoon Sailors are focused on the main thing, warfighting readiness. They, like our other ready Sailors on the Pearl Harbor waterfront, have a sense of urgency.

They know they can adapt and overcome.

Rear Adm. Chung-Hoon, who fought both in World War II and in the Korean War, was part of a tough generation who helped freedom triumph over fascism.

His Sailors knew him for his calm humility and mastery of his ship’s systems, committed to the essentials of seamanship.

Chung-Hoon was born July 25, 1910. He became the first American admiral in the United States Navy of Chinese and Native Hawaiian ancestry and the first of his heritage to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. After a distinguished military and civilian career of service, he died one day before his 69th birthday, July 24, 1979, and is buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, “Punchbowl.”

On September 18, 2004, the Navy commissioned USS Chung-Hoon here at Pearl Harbor.

U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Walter F. Doran said, “This is truly a great day for the United States, for the United States Navy, for the State of Hawaii and, I know, for the Chung-Hoon family. I’m confident the officers and men of this ship will be ready for any challenge.”

Rear Adm. Chung-Hoon’s niece, Michelle Punana Chung-Hoon, a good friend of the Navy, gave the commissioning order: “Sea warriors, man our ship and bring her to life!”

World War II Medal of Honor recipient Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, a leader who knew about adapting and overcoming adversity, served as keynote speaker at the commissioning.

“It is fitting that the ship that carries his name will be home-ported here in the same harbor where the Arizona memorial commemorates his fallen shipmates,” Inouye said.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 19, 2015) Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) heave line during an underway replenishment. Chung-Hoon was undergoing a composite training unit exercise and joint task force exercise, the final step in certifying to deploy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 19, 2015) Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) heave line during an underway replenishment. Chung-Hoon was undergoing a composite training unit exercise and joint task force exercise, the final step in certifying to deploy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released)


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Forged and Ready: Chung-Hoon Legacy

Your Navy Operating Forward –

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PHILIPPINE SEA: An E-2D Hawkeye, assigned to Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)



Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


BALTIC SEA: The Harpers Ferry-class dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) participates in a multinational ship formation during the celebration of the Polish navy’s 100th birthday. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Dengrier M. Baez/Released)

PHILIPPINE SEA: An E-2D Hawkeye, assigned to Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, lands on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) maneuver a rigid-hull inflatable boat during a visit, board, search and seizure drill. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alyssa Weeks/Released)

SEA OF JAPAN: Sailors assigned to the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54) stand by to receive supplies during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann/Released)

U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS: Sgt. Andrew Mocarski, a crew chief assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 162 (Reinforced), 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) looks out of a CH-53E Super Stallion before landing aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7). (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jon Sosner/Released)

SOUTH CHINA SEA: USS Mustin (DDG 89) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, conducts a replenishment-at-sea with the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sonja Wickard/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) fires its 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)

ARABIAN GULF: The Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Hurricane (PC 3) executes tactical maneuvers at sea with the Qatari Emiri navy ship Damsah (Q01) during a bilateral passing exercise. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

BOSPHORUS STRAIT: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) transits the Bosphorus Strait. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ford Williams/Released)

PHILIPPINE SEA: An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, launches from the flight deck of the Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward !


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Your Navy Operating Forward –

Your Navy Operating Forward – Strait of Gibraltar, Ravlunda, Sweden, Marseille, France

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Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.


APRA HARBOR, Guam: The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) returns to its homeport of Apra Harbor, Guam. Oklahoma City is one of four forward-deployed submarines assigned to Submarine Squadron 15. (U.S. Navy photo by Culinary Specialist Seaman Jonathan Perez/Released)

STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR: German navy frigate FGS HESSEN (F 221) trails the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) while transiting the Strait of Gibraltar. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Scott Swofford/Released)

OKINAWA, Japan: Aviation Ordnancemen assigned to the “Skinny Dragons” of Patrol Squadron (VP) 4 load a Mark 54 torpedo on a P-8A Poseidon aircraft during a proficiency exercise on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Juan S. Sua/Released)

U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS: An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter prepares to land aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Raymond Maddocks/Released)

NORWEGIAN SEA: Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) hold the phone and distance line as the ship conducts a replenishment-at-sea with the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary replenishment tanker RFA Tidespring (A136). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Cameron M. Stoner/Released)

RAVLUNDA, Sweden: The Spearhead-class expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Carson City (T-EPF 7), right, maneuvers alongside a Norwegian vessel during BALTOPS 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Kaley Turfitt/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA: An F/A-18E Super Hornet performs a fly-by during a change of command ceremony for the “Fighting Checkmates” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211 aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rebekah A. Watkins/Released)

MARSEILLE, France: The Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) departs Marseille, France, following a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Granado/Released)

STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR: The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducts a strait transit. Harry S. Truman is deployed as part of an ongoing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in international waters around the globe. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Thomas Gooley/Released)

Tell us which photo best shows YOUR Navy Operating Forward!


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“Faces of the Fleet” is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in …

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Your Navy Operating Forward – Strait of Gibraltar, Ravlunda, Sweden, Marseille, France

Presidential Sailors

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On this President’s Day weekend, we’re taking a look at the Sailors who went from shipmates to presidents.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 16, 2018) A graphic illustration depicting the Presidents who have served in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Navy graphic by Kirsten Sisson/Released)
WASHINGTON (Feb. 16, 2018) A graphic illustration depicting the Presidents who have served in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Navy graphic by Kirsten Sisson/Released)


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Presidential Sailors