Making a Navy Sailor

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Rear Adm. Stephen C. Evans
Commander, Naval Service Training Command

Navy Sailors have a long history of being tough and that is no different today. They are physically fit, strategically smart and more resilient than ever.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (March 13, 2017) A recruit division commander motivates and instructs his recruits on marching safety in inclement weather at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Seth Schaeffer/Released)
GREAT LAKES, Ill. (March 13, 2017) A recruit division commander motivates and instructs his recruits on marching safety in inclement weather at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Seth Schaeffer/Released)

How do they do it? It starts with basic military training, where our most experienced Sailors instruct our newest Sailors. To continue our legacy of toughness, experienced Fleet Sailors need to join our training team.

We have more than 320,000 Active Duty Sailors around the world. Nearly 265,000 of those Sailors are in the enlisted ranks, all of them performing vital functions.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Feb. 6, 2017) A recruit division commander motivates recruits during warm-up exercises at Freedom Hall fitness center onboard Recruit Training Command (RTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Seth Schaeffer/Released)
GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Feb. 6, 2017) A recruit division commander motivates recruits during warm-up exercises at Freedom Hall fitness center onboard Recruit Training Command (RTC). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Seth Schaeffer/Released)

Whether they serve on an aircraft carrier, an amphibious assault ship, a cruiser, a Littoral Combat Ship, a destroyer, a submarine, in an aircraft squadron or in an ashore unit, our Sailors are highly capable operators who help protect the world’s sea lanes and keep America safe.

How do we train Sailors to be effective Navy professionals, no matter the type of ship, aircraft or unit in which they serve?

Recruit Training Command at Naval Station Great Lakes is the Navy’s only boot camp where all of our enlisted Sailors start their professional naval service.

From the moment each recruit steps off the bus, all of them with a different background, hometown and upbringing, they are challenged to uphold the Navy Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Oct. 30, 2012) Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Sonseeahray Walker, Recruit Division Commander of the Year, performs a recruit uniform inspection at Recruit Training Command. (U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Liza Swart/Released)
GREAT LAKES, Ill. (Oct. 30, 2012) Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Sonseeahray Walker, Recruit Division Commander of the Year, performs a recruit uniform inspection at Recruit Training Command. (U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Liza Swart/Released)

Over the course of eight weeks, recruits are trained by the Navy’s best Sailors known as recruit division commanders and navigate the crucible of high stress training evolutions designed to push them beyond their mental, physical and emotional limits, preparing them for the operational demands of our warfighting fleet.

By the time they graduate Boot Camp, Sailors will understand the basics of Navy customs and courtesies; grasp the tenants of seamanship and watchstanding; receive weapons training; and be skilled in shipboard firefighting and damage control all while maintaining a physical fitness regimen, in which every Sailor must be able to pass the Navy’s Physical Fitness Assessment before graduating and proceeding to in-rate training.

Furthermore, before graduating boot camp, every enlisted Sailor since 2007 has been battle tested aboard USS Trayer during Battle Stations (BST) 21. Trayer is a 210-foot replica of an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, stocked with state-of-the-art special effects. Recruit toughness is put to the test in this overnight crucible that includes fighting real fires and flooding, simulated missile attacks, mass casualties and ship survivability scenarios.

Just as recruits receive basic military training and mentorship from their recruit division commanders, their transformation continues in the fleet under the supervision of their division leading petty officers and chief petty officers.

GREAT LAKES, Ill. (May 30, 2017) Steelworker 1st Class Zachary Joyce, Recruit Division Commander and leading petty officer of the USS Pearl Harbor barracks at Recruit Training Command (RTC), instructs new recruits on the proper way to fold their blanket when making their racks. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Susan Krawczyk/Released)
GREAT LAKES, Ill. (May 30, 2017) Steelworker 1st Class Zachary Joyce, Recruit Division Commander and leading petty officer of the USS Pearl Harbor barracks at Recruit Training Command (RTC), instructs new recruits on the proper way to fold their blanket when making their racks. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Susan Krawczyk/Released)

We are all accountable to maintain our force readiness through advanced training in the Fleet. To achieve our mission and constantly prepare for the next generations of Sailors, we must continue to invest our most talented Fleet personnel as trainers for our future.

I challenge our fleet Sailors to take up the mantle of responsibility, make a difference for the future of our Navy, and serve a tour of duty as a recruit division commander at Recruit Training Command.


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Making a Navy Sailor

Special Report: USS Fitzgerald Collision

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USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was involved in a collision with a merchant vessel at approximately 2:30 a.m. local time, June 17, while operating about 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan.

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We honor our fallen shipmates.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Sunday, June 18, 2017

An information center is being set up at the Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka Fleet and Family Support Center with…

Posted by U.S. Navy on Friday, June 16, 2017

“As more information is learned, we will be sure to share to it with the Fitzgerald families and when appropriate the public. Thank you for your well wishes and messages of
Statement by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson
"Right now we are focused on two things: the safety of the ship and the well-being of the Sailors. We thank our Japanese partners for their assistance" said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.
Statement by Adm. Scott Swift, commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet

Statement by Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, commander of U.S. 7th Fleet (June 17)

USS Fitzgerald Involved in Collision

USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was involved in a collision with a merchant vessel at approximately 2:30 a.m. local time, June 17, while operating about 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan.

Read more on Navy.mil.

U.S.-Japan SAR Efforts Continue for 7 Missing Fitzgerald Sailors

Search and rescue efforts continue by U.S. and Japanese aircraft and surface vessels in the hopes of recovering seven USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) Sailors.

Read more on Navy.mil.

USS Fitzgerald Returns to Yokosuka

USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), aided by tug boats, returned to Yokosuka at 6:15 p.m. June 17.

Approximately 16 hours earlier, it was involved in a collision with the Philippine-flagged merchant vessel ACX Crystal while operating about 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. Seven of Fitzgerald’s crew remain missing.

Read more on Navy.mil.

Good Evening USS Dewey Families and Friends,Early this morning, USS Dewey (DDG 105) was called upon to render immediate…

Posted by USS Dewey (DDG 105) on Saturday, June 17, 2017

Number of USS Fitzgerald Sailors’ Remains Found

A number of Sailors’ remains that were missing from the collision between USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and a merchant ship have been found.

Read more on Navy.mil.

Vice Adm. Aucoin Holds Press Conference about USS Fitzgerald Collision

The following are U.S. 7th Fleet Commander Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin’s prepared remarks for a press conference held June 18 at Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, about the collision of USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) with a merchant vessel June 17.

Thanks for coming today.

USS Fitzgerald experienced extensive damage and flooding after a collision with the Filipino container ship at 0220 local time, 17 June, approx. 56 nm off the coast of Honshu, Japan.

The damage included a significant impact under the ship’s pilothouse on the starboard side and a large puncture below the ship’s waterline, opening the hull to the sea.

The ship suffered severe damage rapidly flooding three large compartments that included one machinery room and two berthing areas for 116 crew. The commanding officer’s cabin was also directly hit, trapping the CO inside.

The crew’s response was swift and effective, and I want to point out – as we stand by the ship – how proud I am of them.

Heroic efforts prevented the flooding from catastrophically spreading which could have caused the ship to founder or sink. It could have been much worse.

The crew navigated the ship into one of the busiest ports in the world with a magnetic compass and backup navigation equipment. One of two shafts were locked.

Because of the tireless damage control efforts of a resolute and courageous team, the ship was able to make its way back to port safely on its own power last evening.

The Fitzgerald crew responded professionally as all Sailors are expected to fight the damage sustained to their ship. They are known as the “Fighting Fitz” and the crew lived up to that name.

We owe it to our families and the Navy to understand what happened. Under my authority, I am initiating a JAGMAN investigation into this collision, and I will appoint a flag officer to lead that investigation. There will also be a safety investigation.

The U.S. Coast Guard is to take the lead on the marine casualty investigation.

We recognize that there are other organizations who have equities in this incident, and we expect they will conduct their own separate investigations. More information on any further investigations will be forthcoming.

I will not speculate on how long these investigations will last.

As you are aware, we have found the remains of a number of our missing shipmates. Our deepest sympathies are with the families of these Sailors.

Out of concern for the families and the notification process, I will decline to state how many we have found at this time. We owe that to the families and friends of these shipmates and hope you can respect this process.

We will update you after all notifications have been made.

We have transferred remains to Naval Hospital Yokosuka. The families are being notified and will be provided the support they need at this difficult time. Please keep them in your thoughts are prayers.

Their loved ones are what makes this Navy great, so this loss is something we all do feel. The names of the deceased will be released soon.

Unfortunately we don’t have the details regarding the conditions during their final moments, but hope that the investigation may shed some light on that matter.

At the same time, I want to express my most heartfelt appreciation to our Japanese allies for their swift support and assistance.

Japanese Coast Guard ships and helicopters were the first on scene and our first medevac, the ship’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Bryce Benson, was accomplished thanks to a JMSDF helicopter.

A second medevac was performed for two Sailors with minor injuries. All three patients are alert and under observation at Naval Hospital Yokosuka.

We set up a USS Fitzgerald Emergency Family Assistance Center within hours, and disseminated the phone numbers to their hotlines through social media and Navy websites.

This support center remains open for chaplain and counselor care indefinitely, 24/7, on the Fleet and Family Support Center’s 4th floor.

But to be clear: my sole focus now has shifted to helping the grieving family, crew and friends of the Fitzgerald.

The Navy family comes together during a tragedy, and I want to thank the entire Yokosuka community rallying their support in these difficult days. Fellow Sailors, family members and civilian members of the Navy team were all out here last night to welcome Fitzgerald home and provide the crew and grieving families with food, blankets, clothes and emotional support. MWR, Port Operations, NEX, USO, the Chief Petty Officer Mess and many others pulled together to help out.

I ask all of you to keep the affected families in your thoughts and prayers, and respect their privacy as we work to get them the answers they deserve regarding their loved ones.

Editor’s note: These remarks are also posted on Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet’s website.

U.S. Navy Identifies 7 Deceased Fitzgerald Sailors
The remains of seven Sailors previously reported missing were located in flooded berthing compartments, after divers gained access to the spaces, June 18, that were damaged when USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was involved in a collision with the Philippine-flagged merchant vessel ACX Crystal.

Read more on Navy.mil.

Statement from Acting Secretary of the Navy Sean Stackley

We are all deeply saddened by the tragic loss of our fellow shipmates as a result of Friday’s collision between USS Fitzgerald and a commercial container ship, and our thoughts and prayers are with their families.

Read more on Navy.mil.


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Special Report: USS Fitzgerald Collision