USS Michael Murphy the Protector

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By Rear Adm. Brian Fort, commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific

Lt. Michael P. Murphy, namesake of our USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), was tough – physically, mentally and morally.

From an early age he was known as “the Protector.” He looked out for others, whether family, friends or strangers. According to his parents, Maureen and Dan Murphy, of Patchogue, New York, he had a strong understanding of right and wrong and was a natural leader at an early age.


SEAL Lt. Michael P. Murphy, from Patchogue, N.Y. Murphy was killed by enemy forces during a reconnaissance mission, Operation Red Wings, June 28, 2005, while leading a four-man team tasked with finding a key Taliban leader in the mountainous terrain near Asadabad, Afghanistan. (U. S. Navy photo/Released)

His best friend, Owen O’Callaghan, was assigned to New York’s Engine 53 Ladder 43 fire station, which responded to the attacks of September 11, 2001. Lt. Murphy, along with members of his Navy SEAL team, wore the firefighters’ patch as a sign of solidarity in their fight against terrorists.

The crest of USS Michael Murphy is inspired by the design in the firefighting company’s patch. And, firefighters of Ladder 53 Engine 43 wear the Navy SEAL patch in return.

Nearly all Sailors – and many civilians – know the story of Lt. Michael Murphy and his awesome courage as he fought and died to save his fellow SEALs in Afghanistan, June 28, 2005.

Outnumbered and severely wounded in combat he purposely exposed himself to enemy fire to call in assistance for his team.

For his unwavering selfless courage Murphy received the Medal of Honor, awarded posthumously. We honor and remember his toughness – and his fairness.


The Medal of Honor rests on a flag beside a SEAL trident during preparations for an award ceremony for Lt. Michael P. Murphy. Murphy was killed by enemy forces during a reconnaissance mission, Operation Red Wings, June 28, 2005, while leading a four-man team tasked with finding a key Taliban leader in the mountainous terrain near Asadabad, Afghanistan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brandan W. Schulze/Released)

Lt. Murphy’s memory continues to inspire Sailors who serve and “lead the fight” aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy, homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

USS Michael Murphy has deployed three times in the past year, including with both Carl Vinson Strike Group and the Wasp Expeditionary Strike Group.

Last year, Michael Murphy spent more than 200 days underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet and U.S. 7th Fleet operating areas, conducted eight port visits in five countries and steamed 60,000 nautical miles.


Sailors aboard the Arleigh Burke-Class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) prepare to participate in a fueling-at-sea with the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jasen Morenogarcia/Released)

In 2018 Michael Murphy conducted South China Sea operations; making port visits to Guam and Manila, Republic of the Philippines and conducting Oceania Maritime Security Initiative operations with a U.S. Coast Guard detachment to protect fishing areas and enforce maritime laws.

Recently, Sailors of Michael Murphy represented the Navy at Fleet Week in Portland, Oregon before returning and deploying again.

During Fleet Weeks, the men and women of DDG-112 provided ship tours to thousands of people, including young people who had an opportunity to learn about namesake Navy SEAL Lt. Michael P. Murphy.

In recent weeks we learned that a 14-year-old boy desecrated a memorial plaque in Lt. Michael P. Murphy Park in Lake Ronkonkoma, New York.


The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Murphy (DDG 112) makes its way through New York Harbor in preparation for its commissioning Oct. 6. The new destroyer honors the late Lt. (SEAL) Michael P. Murphy, a New York native. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Erik Swanson/Released)

While some people reacted with anger and hate, I was heartened to see the reaction of Michael’s parents, Dan and Maureen Murphy. Maureen is USS Michael Murphy’s sponsor.

Maureen Murphy said, “The boy who did this, he’s a child. He did something foolish. And everybody has done something foolish when they’re younger.” Michael’s father, Dan Murphy, said, “Michael was the type of person who would have wanted to take this person under his wing and talk to him. I hope they educate this young man.”

This kind of understanding, forgiveness and compassion is another kind of toughness, a kind all leaders need. It’s easy to see how their son grew to be the man he became.

In “Seal of Honor” author Gary Williams writes, “Michael was able to see both the good and bad in people … He inherently believed the best in people and always gave them the benefit of any doubt.”

When Michael was in the eighth grade – around the age of the teen who vandalized the plaque – he saw a group of boys bullying a special education student, trying to push the child into a locker. Michael stood up to them and got in a fight with several of them. It would not be the last time he would step up to bullies and lead the fight.

That’s when he earned the nickname “the Protector.”

Today, Sailors aboard USS Michael Murphy protect and defend our nation as part of Navy’s living legacy, dedicated to providing security and stability in the name of freedom.


The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) transits the Philippine Sea . (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel M. Young/Released)


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USS Michael Murphy the Protector

Team Navy Competes at 2017 DOD Warrior Games

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Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Team Navy at the 2017 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Chicago.

Team Navy is comprised of 36 Sailors and four Coast Guardsmen who are competing June 30 to July 8 against other military teams to compete for gold, silver and bronze medals in archery, cycling, field, shooting, sitting volleyball, swimming, track and wheelchair basketball.

This is first time the Navy has hosted the Games and is the first time they have been held in a public venue since the DoD became involved in hosting the Games in 2010.

Roster Sports Schedule

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6

Follow this blog throughout the Games for the latest on Team Navy.

Day 6 (July 6)

Cycling

Day 5 (July 5)

Field

Day 4 (July 3)

Archery

Day 3 (July 2)

Track

Day 2 (July 1)

Opening Ceremony

Warrior Games Opening Ceremony

It’s time for the 2017 Warrior Games in Chicago opening ceremony with Jon Stewart. 39 Sailors are participating in the Paralympic-style completion for wounded, ill and injured service members in Chicago. Go Navy!

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, July 1, 2017

CHICAGO (July 1, 2017) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and his wife Dana Richardson cheer during the Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games’ opening ceremony at Soldier Field in Chicago. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Chief Elliott Fabrizio/Released)
CHICAGO (July 1, 2017) Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson and his wife Dana Richardson cheer during the Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games’ opening ceremony at Soldier Field in Chicago. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Chief Elliott Fabrizio/Released)

Sitting Volleyball

LIVE NOW: Team Navy competing against United States Air Force in sitting volleyball at Warrior Games, a Paralympic-style competition, against other military branches, the United Kingdom and Australia for wounded, ill and injured service members. Go Navy!

Posted by U.S. Navy on Saturday, July 1, 2017

Rifle

Day 1 (June 30)

Team Navy Kicks Off 2017 Warrior Games

Warrior Games Day 1

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Warrior Games got underway today in Chicago.Watch for a look at Team Navy’s competition in shooting, wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball on Day 1.

Posted by U.S. Navy on Friday, June 30, 2017

Team Navy kicked off the annual Department of Defense Warrior Games June 30 in Chicago, Illinois, with competition in shooting, wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball.

Read more on Navy.mil

Archery

Shooting

Wheelchair Basketball

About Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor Adaptive Sports and Recreation Program

The mission of the Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor Adaptive Sports and Recreation Program is to deliver year-round competitive and recreation opportunities for wounded, ill or seriously injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen. Adaptive sports — athletic activities that are modified to meet the abilities of injured or ill individuals — are essential to the recuperation of our wounded warriors. All enrollees in Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor are encouraged to make athletics a key component of their recovery and rehabilitation plans. The proven and lasting benefits of adaptive sports and reconditioning activities include higher self-esteem, lower stress levels and fewer secondary medical conditions.

Navy Wounded Warrior – Safe Harbor hosts a series of adaptive athletic reconditioning camps, provides information relative to recreational opportunities and facilitates enrollees’ participation in the annual Department of Defense Warrior Games. Non-medical care managers and recovery care coordinators, along with the transition coordinators, are encouraged to brief all recovering and transitioning service members about adaptive sports opportunities.

Once registered for the sports program, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen are provided with information on all athletic opportunities, including the annual trials where athletes can compete for a spot on Team Navy in the DoD Warrior Games. Participants in the trials include active-duty service members and veterans with upper-body, lower-body and spinal cord injuries; serious illnesses; traumatic brain injuries; amputations; visual impairment; and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Athletes possessing professionalism, team spirit and the best qualifying times and/or scores are selected to compete on Team Navy in the DoD Warrior Games. The DoD Warrior Games represent the culmination of participation in structured adaptive sports and reconditioning activities of wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans throughout their recovery by encouraging participation in physical and cognitive activities, inspiring physical fitness, mental strength and peer support, and encouraging new opportunities for growth and achievement.


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Team Navy Competes at 2017 DOD Warrior Games

Worth A Thousand Words: Say Goodbye Girls

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Photo: A Marine bids farewell to his wife and two daughters as elements of the famed Second Marine Division leave for the West Coast. Official U.S. Marine Corps Photograph, from the "All Hands" collection at the Naval History & Heritage Command.

A Marine bids farewell to his wife and two daughters as elements of the famed Second Marine Division leave for the West Coast, Aug. 1950. (U.S. Marine Corps photo courtesy of Naval History & Heritage Command/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Say Goodbye Girls

Wounded, Ill and Injured Warriors Annex Opens

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Featured in this All Hands Update, a new Wounded, Ill and Injured Annex opens up in at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

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Disclaimer: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense of this website or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD website.

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Wounded, Ill and Injured Warriors Annex Opens

Worth A Thousand Words: Suite Up

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Photo: Lance Cpl. Dylan Shuler, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), helps Lance Cpl. Jarrod Roper, 22nd MEU, don his level "B" protective suit during hazardous material response training at the Guardian Centers in Perry, Ga., June 21, 2013.  The training was a week long course that was custom-tailored to the needs of the 22nd MEU.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Austin Hazard.Marine Lance Cpl. Dylan Shuler helps Lance Cpl. Jarrod Roper don his level “B” protective suit during hazardous material response training at the Guardian Centers in Perry, Ga., June 21, 2013.  The training was a week long course that was custom-tailored to the needs of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Austin Hazard/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Suite Up

Worth A Thousand Words: Watch for Sparks

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Photo: U.S. Navy Fireman George Weckman fabricates a coat rack in the weld shop aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) June 5, 2013, while underway in the Indian Ocean. (Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Derek W. Volland /Released)

U.S. Navy Seaman George Weckman fabricates a coat rack in the weld shop aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) while underway in the Indian Ocean, June 5, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Derek W. Volland /Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Watch for Sparks

Worth A Thousand Words: Stretcher-Bound

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Sailors practice first aid.

U.S. sailors assigned to the visit, board, search and seizure team aboard the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) learn how to prepare a stretcher-bound patient for medical evacuation during a training exercise in Singapore, May 28, 2013. The Freedom is in Singapore as part of a deployment to Southeast Asia. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Cassandra Thompson/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Stretcher-Bound

The Doctor Is In: Make Nutrition Work for You

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Story by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Andrew Plummer, Population Health Branch Chief, Tricare Management Activity

Photo: Sailors choose healthy eating options during meal time. (U.S. Navy file photo/Released)

Sailors choose healthy eating options during meal time. (U.S. Navy file photo/Released)

Most people have heard the consistent drum beat about how to lose weight and be healthy – eat a balanced diet focused on fruits and vegetables but minimize sodium, sugars and fat. However, it can be hard to apply that basic knowledge to gain a better understanding of the food you eat and apply it to your diet and lifestyle.

The first chapter in many weight loss stories is to take stock of your current health and set medically appropriate and achievable goals. Losing weight too quickly is neither healthy nor sustainable. Consult your primary care physician before starting your weight loss program to understand your body mass index and create a plan to achieve your healthy weight. Your doctor can also help you set incremental goals, creating a sense of achievement by meeting interim steps as you progress.

Next, you need to make sure you eat healthy foods. In our marketplace, many foods branded “healthy” include little nutritional value or high levels of unhealthy ingredients, like sodium. It’s hard to go wrong choosing fresh fruits and vegetables. When selecting packaged foods, use the nutrition facts label to find out how healthy it really is. Start with the serving size. This can help you regulate portion size, an important part of a healthy diet. The label also includes things whose intake you should limit, like calories from fat, cholesterol and sodium, and nutrients you need to stay healthy, like fiber and vitamins.

Study the label at the supermarket, and only stock up on healthy foods to make your decisions on what to eat at home much easier.

A balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables is your best bet to lose weight in a healthy way. Many popular fad or designer diets may be successful in shedding pounds, but are hard to maintain and may not provide the complete nutrition your body needs. An example of a balanced diet to consider is the Mediterranean diet. A growing body of scientific evidence suggests it helps prevent heart disease.

A few simple tips can also make a big difference. Instead of drastically changing your diet, try replacing a few things every day with fruit or vegetables. Instead of a high calorie snack in the afternoon, have an apple or an orange. Replace a baked potato with a sweet potato, or switch to a low sodium version of your favorite treat. Try carrots and hummus instead of chips and salsa. Change your behavior at mealtime, like eating slower or leaving food on your plate. Little changes like this can become habits that contribute to better health.

Another useful tip is to plan your meals in advance. If you have a week’s worth of healthy options for dinner, you’re less likely to resort to unhealthy, last-minute options.

A balanced diet is something you can share with your whole family. Getting your children to love fruits and vegetables at an early age offers a lifetime of benefits, from a reduced risk of high blood pressure and heart disease to improved mood and behavior.

Obesity is a dangerous epidemic, and while the military community is healthier than Americans in general, we can all take steps to ensure we have a healthy diet. When healthy, you will feel better physically and mentally and pass healthy habits onto your children. Visit www.tricare.mil/healthyliving for monthly tips on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

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The Doctor Is In: Make Nutrition Work for You

Worth A Thousand Words: Unraveling the Flag

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Photo:  Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Adams helps in the unraveling of the flag in preparation for Bremerton's Armed Forces Day Parade. USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) recently returned from an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibilities in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and continued Theater Security Cooperation efforts. U.S. Navy Photo by Seaman Jose L. Hernandez.Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Adams helps unravel the flag in preparation for Bremerton’s Armed Forces Day Parade in Bremerton, Wash., May 18, 2013. (U.S. Navy Photo by Seaman Jose L. Hernandez/Released)

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Worth A Thousand Words: Unraveling the Flag