Trident Fury Enhances U.S. Navy Partnership with Royal Canadian Navy

One of the Navy’s core responsibilities, according to Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert’s Sailing Directions, is to “foster and sustain cooperative relationships with an expanding set of allies and international partners to enhance global security.”

In the waters west of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, U.S. Navy Sailors aboard USS Ford (FFG 54)USS Spruance (DDG 111) and USS Lake Champlain (CG 57) are executing that mission with the Royal Canadian Navy through Exercise Trident Fury.

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Edmonton (MM 703) left, Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) center, and Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Ottawa (FFH 341), right, participate in a maneuvering exercise during Exercise Trident Fury, May 4. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Brown/Released)

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Edmonton (MM 703) left, Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) center, and Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Ottawa (FFH 341), right, participate in a maneuvering exercise during Exercise Trident Fury, May 4. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Brown/Released)

Trident Fury is a biennial joint and multinational naval training exercise led by the Royal Canadian Navy and is designed to provide mutually beneficial, realistic and relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy.

During the exercise, Sailors from Ford and Spruance will participate in many bilateral evaluations including anti-submarine warfare, war-at-sea exercises, daily multi-ship maneuvering and gunnery exercises on a flying target.

The bilateral training exercise, which began May 3, was developed by Canada’s Pacific Joint Task Force Headquarters to building a strong working relationship between the maritime and aviation forces of the United States and Canada.

Ensign Ben Ingersoll, the combat information center officer aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Ford (FFG 54), searches the horizon during the ship's departure from Naval Station Everett to participate in Exercise Trident Fury, April 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Blees/Released)

Ensign Ben Ingersoll, the combat information center officer aboard the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Ford (FFG 54), searches the horizon during the ship’s departure from Naval Station Everett to participate in Exercise Trident Fury, April 29. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Blees/Released)

Commander, Canadian Fleet Pacific and Exercise Director, Commodore Bishop, OMM, CD, explains what Trident Fury means to America and Canada’s navies.

I am proud to see Trident Fury 13 underway as Canadian and American ships depart from Esquimalt Harbour. It is an incredible endeavour to bring together more than 2,000 Sailors, soldiers, airmen and airwomen from Canada and the United States to train jointly in order to keep our waters safe.

The United States and Canada share a longstanding and well-entrenched relationship, and our successful defence partnership provides both countries with great security.

Trident Fury offers a valuable opportunity for the Canadian Armed Forces to maintain operational readiness to deploy alongside our allies. The exercise also helps to strengthen the communication and coordination between our forces, while also helping Canadian and American sailors maintain the skills required to work in a task group environment during international operations.

This year, Trident Fury 13 will offer a full spectrum of air, land and sea tactical warfare training, with the aim of enhancing Canada’s ability to respond to threats and unlawful acts. It will test our ability to act efficiently and effectively in situations of deterrence, surveillance, combat and security operations within a joint environment.

I am tremendously pleased to have the honour to work with our friends and partners in the [U.S. Navy]. Trident Fury promises to be a great exercise and both of our navies will gain terrific training from the experience.

Why do you think international exercises like Trident Fury are important?

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Trident Fury Enhances U.S. Navy Partnership with Royal Canadian Navy