3 Things Sailors Need to Know about the New Maritime Strategy

The sea services released a new maritime strategy, a plan that describes how the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard will design, organize, and employ naval forces in support of national security interests and homeland security objectives.

Most Sailors are aware that the Navy follows an overarching strategy; however, they may not always understand their role in this strategy.
Forty-two ships and submarines representing 15 international partner nations maneuver into a close formation during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014, July 25. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel participated in RIMPAC exercise from June 26 to Aug. 1, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2014 was the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Shannon Renfroe/Released)

Forty-two ships and submarines representing 15 international partner nations maneuver into a close formation during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014, July 25. Twenty-two nations, more than 40 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel participated in RIMPAC exercise from June 26 to Aug. 1, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2014 was the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Shannon Renfroe/Released)

Here are three things you need to know about the new maritime strategy, A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower: Forward, Engaged, Ready:
  1. The new strategy was updated to account for changes in global security, new strategic guidance, and the fiscal environment. Since the last strategy was released in 2007, many geopolitical and military changes have also developed that demand cooperative relationships with our global partners. We will continue operating in NATO maritime groups, participating in a number of international training exercises, and conducting goodwill engagements.
  2. A new function called “all domain access” was introduced with the updated strategy. All domain access focuses on gaining access to areas – whether it is land, air, sea, space, cyberspace, or the electromagnetic spectrum – and operating freely in those areas to complete our mission. Today’s strategy also emphasizes operating forward and engaging partners across the globe, especially in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.
  3. The strategy calls for increasing the Navy’s forward presence to 120 ships by 2020, up from about 97 ships today. This includes forward-basing four ballistic-missile-defense destroyers in Spain and stationing another attack submarine in Guam by the end of 2015. Sailors can expect to see an increase in forward-basing of forces abroad, which reduces costly rotations and deployments.
Implementing a new strategy would be impossible without you, the Sailor. The Navy’s personnel are its greatest asset and understanding your role in the new strategy will help in completing the mission.

Read more: 

3 Things Sailors Need to Know about the New Maritime Strategy