Ready and Resilient: 10 Facts About Deployment Health Assessments

Today’s blog is from DHAP Strategic Communications

1. Deployment Health Assessments (DHAs) are PRIVATE and CONFIDENTIAL. Protected under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Act, the information you disclose in the Pre-DHA, PDHA and PDHRA is between you and your health care provider.

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 (PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

2. Deployment Health Assessments helps build resilience, enhances performance, and increases readiness. Deployment Health Assessments (DHAs) connect you with the health care you need to prevent future medical challenges and to address emerging conditions.

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 (PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

3. Deployment Health Assessments are designed to protect your health before, during and after you deploy.  The Deployment Health Assessments (DHAs) are taken at three separate points in time: before deployment; upon redeployment; and 90-180 days after you return from deployment. DHAs identify emerging health concerns such as TBI, PTSD, depression, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, environmental exposures and physical injuries related to deployment.

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(DEPLOYMENT HEALTH CYCLE)

4. Deployment Health Assessments allow you to take care of yourself so you can focus on your family, friends and career. Regardless of length, deployments can feel overwhelming and challenging for you and your family in so many ways. By taking the responsibility to protect your health, you are taking the steps to get the care you deserve to ensure that you will enjoy and support your family.

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(PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

5. Unit level Personnel Officers (G1s/S1s) in partnership with Medical Staff Officers are good resources and are well versed in Deployment Health Assessments. Whether you’re taking the Pre-DHA, PDHA or PDHRA – personnel and medical staff officers are your first resource when it comes to protecting your health during the deployment cycle.   PAO5

(PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

 6. DHAP supports Active Duty, Reservists, National Guard and Army Civilians. The Total Army Active, Army Reserve and Army National Guard has dedicated unit staff and coordinators that manage deployment health assessments in support of your unit commanders. To find your DHAP Coordinator, click here or email us.

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7. Deployment Health Assessments cover a multitude of health topics and symptoms. The Pre-DHA, PDHA and PDHRA consist of an online self-assessment and a 1-on-1 confidential appointment with a health care provider. The health care provider will advise you if additional health care services are required and provide a referral for that care. Self assessment questions cover alcohol abuse, PTSD, violence/assaults, depression, prescription use, TBI and women’s health issues.

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(PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

8. There is special deployment cycle resilience training available. Deployment CycleResilience Training (DCRT) promotes life, performance and psychological skills for Soldiers, spouses, commanders and unit staff. DCRT is conducted in platoon-sized elements by CSF2-trained Master Resilience Trainers (MRTs). Commanders should consider coordinating DCRT prior to administering deployment health assessments to help set the conditions for maximum participation and honest disclosure. To download materials, please visit CSF2.

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(PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

9. Your Commander plays a very important role when it comes to deployment health. Research shows Commanders who actively and regularly discuss the importance of deployment health assessments help maximize participation and result in the honest disclosure of potential health issues.

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10. Deployment Health Assessments support any type of deployment, OCONUS or CONUS, regardless of duration. Deployment Health Assessments are required for all CONUS/OCONUS deployment conditions (e.g. operational deployments, training events, humanitarian missions, etc.) of 30 days or more to locations that are not supported by a fixed US Military Treatment Facility (MTF). For OCONUS deployments of 30 days or less, OCONUS deployments with fixed U.S. MTFs, and CONUS deployments – deployment health activities are based on the health threats identified during the deployment and the commander exercising operational control.

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(PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Army)

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The Deployment Health Assessment Program (DHAP)is dedicated to increase the operational readiness of the U.S. Army and strengthen the resilience of Soldiers and Department of the Army Civilians who are deploying or returning from deployment. DHAP provides early identification of emerging deployment related health conditions and serves as a gateway to care and treatment. The goal is to connect Soldiers and Army Civilians with the right care at the right time.

The U.S. Army Deployment Health Assessment Program (DHAP) is part of the Army G-1, Army Resilience Directorate (ARD) in support of Army Ready & Resilient.

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To learn more about DHAP, go to www.dhap.army.mil, or visit us on AKO at (https://www.us.army.mil/suite/page/598655). For questions, send an email to dhap.g1.fieldinquiry@us.army.mil.

Excerpt from: 

Ready and Resilient: 10 Facts About Deployment Health Assessments